(FW) Finnegans Wake: Throwing Whimsy around Like Blazes p 85.20- 86.31

Contents

Log

A Key to Pagination

[Page nn-] The page begun at the previous monthly session but not completed.

[Page nn] A full page completed.

[Page nn+] a page with one paragraph completed but the page incomplete.

Sources

  • Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake
  • Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake
  • Combined Lexicon and Occasional Summaries from Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com) and Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake 

100 Words

[Note: My speculation will always appear in brackets so that you can easily ignore it.]

Log

 The cruise got underway at Book I, Chapter 4, Page 85.20, and docked again at 86.31.

Sources

Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake

Page 85.20- 86.31

The authors provide some assistance: “The Crown attempted to prove that King, alías Crowbar, impersonating a chimney sweep, having rubbed mud on his face to disguise himself, and gone to the fair in Mudford, on a Thursday, under the assumed names of Tykingfest and Rabwore { i.e., Festy King and Crowbar, twisted about} with a pedigree pig and a hyacinth. The court gathering, convened to help the Irish Muck look his brother Dane in the face and attended by large numbers in spite of the deluge, was distinctly of the scattery kind (Campbell and Robinson 87).

William York Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake

Tindall as the court recorder: Suddenly we are at Earwicker’s trial at the Old Bailey in London for whatever he did in the Park in Dublin. As Festy King in the “dry dock” (raised from his watery grave), H.C. E. seems as composite as Hosty, a mixture of father and son. (Festus, joyful or merry in Latin, describes the Prankquean’s Hilary or Shem.Cf. “Finnerty the Festive,” 41.24) P.C. Robort (police constable) testifies for the crown that King, alias Crowbar ( C. Robort?), disguising his face with “clanetourf” (from Clane and Clontarf– not Balaklava), assumed the names of Tykingfest (Festy King) and Rabworc (Crowbar) at the Mudford fair with an unlicensed blind pig and a hyacinth, after having landed, two by two, from Noah’s ark– after the deluge, into the mud (85.23-86.31) (Tindall 87)

Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com)
and
Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake [Entries below introduced by line numbers “l n.nn” and italicized]

Page 85.20

headway – advance, progress (in general) + FDV: As if that would not do but little headway was made when a countryman Festy King who gave an address in Monaghan Joyce Country in the heart of a wellfamed poteen district was subsequently brought up on an improper improperly framed indictment of both courts. It was attempted to show that having come to rubbed some dirt on his face to disguise himself he was at the door fair of a Monday with a pig this animal ate some of the doorpost, King selling it because it _____, ate the woodwork off her sty. An eyewitness said he remembered the fifth of November [which was going to go down in the annals of history& one thing that particularly struck him was he saw or heard unquestionably a man named Pat O’Donnell beat & murder another of the Kings, Simon, but when the ambush was laid there was not as much light as wd light dima child’s altar and to the perplexedly uncondemnatory bench, the first King, Festy, declared through his interpreter on his oath & before God & their honours that he did not fire a stone either before or after he was born up to that day & this he supplemented had the neck to supplement in the same language by postasserting that he wd impart he might never ask to see sight or light of this world or the next world [or any other world] if ever he took or threw the sign of a stone either before or after being baptised up to that blessed & holy hour.

Mam (mam) (geal) – Breach, Mountain pass; village, Co. Galway + Joyce’s note: ‘Interpreter / – Maam’; † ‘Ireland at the Bar’, 197: Several years ago a sensational trial was held in Ireland. In a lonely place in a western province, called Maamtrasna, a murder was committed. Four of five townsmen, all belonging to the ancient tribe of the Joyces, were arrested. The oldest of them, the seventy year old Myles Joyce, was the prime suspect. Public opinion at the time thought him innocent and today considers him a martyr. Neither the old man nor the others accused knew English. The court had to resort to the services of an interpreter. The questioning, conducted through the interpreter, was at times comic and at times tragic. On one side was the excessively ceremonious interpreter, on the other the patriarch of a miserable tribe unused to civilized customs, who seemed stupefied by all the judicial ceremony.[…] The figure of this dumbfounded old man, a remnant of a civilization not ours, deaf and dumb before his judge, is a symbol of the Irish nation at the bar of public opinion + ‘Maamtrasna, is anglicised as ‘Maam Cross’.
l.23 Maamtrasna: scene of murders in 1882 for which Myles Joyce executed after unsound trial; Festus King: shop in Clifden Con. Galway

Festy = (notebook 1922-23): ‘Festus Joyce, Recess’
tar and feather = to smear with tar and then cover with feathers: a punishment sometimes inflicted by a mob (esp. in U.S.) on an unpopular or scandalous character.

l. 25 G Mansch: mixture; Romansch language

MAYO OF THE SAXONS – “Yew-Plain of the Saxons”: Monastery, now ruins and site of village of Mayo 3 miles South of Balla, County Mayo; est. 7th century by St Colman for English monks from Inishbofin following disputes between Irish and English monks there [(notebook 1923): ‘Mayo of the Saxons’].

foulfamed = far famed – that is famed to a great distance, well known

potheen (Anglo-Irish) = illicit whiskey

hale = to draw up, to constrain or draw forcibly to, to bring in violently, drag in.

Old Bailey = the seat of the Central Criminal Court in London {Earwicker at the Old Bailey courhouse in London}

calends = the first day of any month in the Roman calendar
Mars = March
l.27 calends of March: 1 March, 1st day of Roman year

equinoxious = equinox – the condition of having the days and nights of equal length. Also fig.+ [poisonous]

fetch = something that looks exactly like another, counterpart; the phantom double of a living person appearing as an omen of the death; a contrivance, dodge, trick + “One man’s meat is another man’s poison” (‘meat’ is often to be understood in the slang sense of ‘penis’) + poisson (fr) – fish.

cushat = the wood-pigeon or ring-dove + to fly pigeons (Slang) – to steal coal.

ouveralls = overalls – an external covering, cloak, waterproof, trousers + ouver = over.

fesses – pl. of fess – a broad bar drawn horizontally across the middle of a heraldic field + fesses (fr) – buttocks + far fesso (it) – to make a fool of someone + [confesses]

immodst = in mids – amidst, in the middle (of)

Oyeh = Oje! (ger) – oh dear! + [Oyez, oyez, oyez = the summons to the court]
l.31 ‘oyez!’ opens court session

soaked = dull, lacking in animation; steeped, macerated; saturated, drenched; intoxicated.

methylate = to impregnate with methanol + methylated spirit – form in which alcohol is most commonly employed for industrial purposes.

in dry dock = inactive, unemployed; in quarantine, in hospital + dry dock – a dock that can be kept dry for use during the construction or repairing of ships + dock – the enclosure in a criminal court in which the prisoner is placed at his trial.

ambrosia (gr, l) = food of the goods + aureolus (l) – golden.
l.32 Ambrosius Aurelianus, semimythical champion, led Romanized Britons against Hengist in C5

Kersse’s = kersey – a coarse woolen cloth for hose and work clothes, homespun

fight shirt = nightshirt – a nightgown resembling a shirt
l.34 nightshirt (Parnell; 388.03)

straw = of the color of straw

souwester – a large oilskin or waterproof hat or cap worn by seamen to protect the head and neck during rough or wet weather.

corkscrew = resembling a corkscrew; spirally twisted; an imperfection in silk filaments.

trowswers = trousers

all out of the true = out of the blue – unexpectedly, without warning

torn up = to tear up – to pull asunder by force (esp. cloth or paper)

cymtrymanx = WALES – Principality of UK forming the wide peninsula on the West of the island of Britain. Lat, Cambria; Welsh, Cymry.  

bespoke – Of goods: Ordered to be made, as distinguished from ready-made + bespeak – to be the outward expression of; to indicate, give evidence of.
l.36 bespoke: tailor-made; Mamertine:medieval Roman prison

 mamertime = CARCER – The small prison North-East of the Forum in Rome where criminals were held pending trial. From medieval times called the “Mamertine prison.” + Mamer – Oscan name for Mars.

END Page 85

 

 

Page 86

exute = to strip (a person) of, to divest of + exutio (l) – an exclusion + [a venia] exutio (eccl. l) – they who are excluded from divine forgivenness, the utterly reprobate (St. Ambrose) + exutoire (fr) – outlet, release [(notebook 1924): ‘exutoire’].
l.1 L exutio: an exclusion; flowers of speech: L fluor: flow; fluorspar: native calcium fluoride; Constabulary

sparse = to spread or disseminate (a rumour, doctrine, etc.) + speach

(notebook 1924): ‘had the vocabulary royal Irish -‘ (dash dittoes’ vocabulary’)

padderjagmartin = Peter, Jack, Martin – in Swift’s Tale of a Tub, they are the Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran churches. In FW they are also the Three. 
l.2 tripartite; Piezo-electricity generated in quartz crystals by pressure

suet = suit

sulfeit = sulfate

copperas = copperas – protosulphates of copper, iron and zinc 
l.3 copperas: cupric, ferrous or zinc sulphate; quite

quatz = [quartz] + [quo tis = something given for quartz] 

chrystalisations = crystallization – the action of forming crystals, or of assuming a crystalline structure. + [cocoon]

Alum = a whitish transparent mineral salt, crystallizing in octahedrons + Adam
l.4 Adam and Eve; G Feuer anzustecken light a fire

to stick fire = to strike fire – to produce (fire, a spark) by percussion, esp. by the percussion of flint and steel + Joyce’s note: ‘stick fire’ + lit. Feuer anzustecken (ger) – to light a fire.

feacht = in fact + feacht (fyokht) (geal) – turn, time, occasion.
l.5 I feacht: turn, time, in fact

drip = Of a person or object: To have moisture or liquid falling off in drops; to be so copiously wet or saturated with as to shed drops; to complain, grumble.

pipkin = a small earthenware pot or pan, used chiefly in cookery

coold = cold + [the dead + Finn McCool]
l.6 Colertraine, town, Co. Derry, known for whiskey

crown = crown lawyer – a lawyer in the service of the Crown; a lawyer who practices in criminal cases.

P.C.  = police constable

Robort = policeman + [robot + abort = satellite]

elois = alias + FDV: It was attempted to show that having come to rubbed some dirt on his face to disguise himself he was at the door fair of a Monday with a pig this animal ate some of the doorpost, King selling it because it ______ ate the woodwork off her sty. An eyewitness said he remembered the fifth of November [which was going to go down in the annals of history& one thing that particularly struck him was he saw or heard unquestionably a man named Pat O’Donnell beat & murder another of the Kings, Simon, but when the ambush was laid there was not as much light as wd light dim a child’s altar and to the perplexedly uncondemnatory bench, the first King, Festy, declared through his interperter on his oath &before God & their honours that he did not fire a stone either before or after he was born up to that day & this he supplemented had the neck to supplement in the same language by postasserting that he wd impart he might never ask to see sight or light of this world or the next world [or any other world] if ever he took or threw the sign of a stone either before or after being baptised up to that blessed & holy hour.

crowbar = an iron bar with a wedge-shaped end + crowbar brigade (Slang) – Irish constabulary.

l.8 Cathal Crovdearg deposed Roderick O’Connor, last High King of Ireland; Malachy II succeeded Brian Boru as High King of Ireland
Meleky = milk + melecky (Arabic) – king + melekh (Hebrew) – king.

l.9 pieces; ALP; smear
peatsmoor = [bog]

plucks = pluck (Anglo-Irish) = pluc (pluk) (geal) – cheek

pussas = puss (Anglo-Irish) = pus (Irish) = pusa (puse) (geal) – lips, mouth
clanetourf = clane – clean + [The Battle of Clontarf] 
l.10 Clontard- clean turf; Clane, village, Co. Kildare

middlewhite fair in Mudford = fluor – a flow or flowing; pl. = flowers + (notebook 1924): ‘Eng. villages / White Ladies Aston / Martyr Worthy / Swine / Foulmire / Mucking / Mudford / Barton in the Beans / Great Snoring / Eggbuckland / Toft Monks / Nether Wallop / Toller Porcorum / Huish Champflower’.
l. 11 Middlewhite: a class of a pig; Thor

of a Thoorsday = of (Dublin Colloquial) – on (when referring to days of the week) + thoor (Anglo-Irish) – tower

feishts = feast + feis (fesh) (geal) – festival, convention.
l.12 I feiste: entertainment; G feist: fat; Festy King & Crowbar; Peter & Paul

Peeler = policeman

Rabworc = rab (rob) (geal) – hog

Anthony = the patron saint of swine heards + Anthony (Slang) – smallest or favourite pig of a litter.

tellafun book = telephone book

 ellegedly = allegedly 

unlicensed = unauthorized by license, lawless
l. 15 Erie; 3 brothers, Heber, Heremon & Ir, led Milesian invasion of Ireland

cry crack = to give up, to desist

paddlewicking = paddle wheel – a wheel used for propelling a boat or ship + song Paddy Whack (This old man, he played one, / He played knick-knack on my thumb. / With a knick-knack, paddy whack, / Give a dog a bone, / This old man came rolling home.) + paddywhack – a spank or spanking.

amadst = amidst – in or into the middle or centre of

suckling = suckling – an infant that is at the breast or is unweaned; a young animal that is suckled; esp. a sucking calf.

merrymeg = meg – woman, a country girl, boisterous woman

meddle = the action of meddling; a medley + middle
l.20 maelstrom

convene = to come together, to assemble; to cause to come together, to convoke [(notebook 1924): ‘convened’].

Prepostoral = pastoral – of or pertaining to shepherds or their occupation

muck = the dung of cattle (usually mixed with decomposing vegetable refuse) used for manure + muc (muk) (geal) – pig.
l.21 The Ir. Agricultural Organisation Society founded by Sir Horace Plunkett; pastoral; I muc: pig

look = Joyce’s note: ‘looked me in face’
l.22 (competition from Denmark as obstacle to Ir. bacon industry)
attend = to present oneself, for the purpose of taking some part in the proceedings, at a meeting for business, worship, instruction, entertainment; to turn the mind to, give consideration or pay heed to, regard, consider. 

Larry = confusion, noise, excitement
tospite = despite – in spite of
scattery = scattered, marked by scattering
bally – bloody (a vague epithet expressing anger, resentment, detestation) + Ballybricken Green in Waterford City was once a suburb where lived the pigjobbers who purchased the pigs for Waterford’s bacon factories (John Garvin) + (notebook 1924): ‘Ballybricken pigs (Waterford)’ → Freeman’s Journal 3 May 1924, 10/6: ‘By the Way’: ‘Not far from the picturesque and busy Quay at Waterford is the far-famed Ballybricken, the heart of the bacon industry, and the home of the best-known body of pig-buyers in Ireland’.
l.23 pig totem animal of Jews; Gr to spiti: the house

l.24 Scattery Island, C. Clare; Ballybrickan: suburb of Waterford once inhabited by the pig -brokers

cockofthewalking = cock of the walk – one that dominates a group or situation esp. overbaringly + [Mississippi River slang- toughest bargeman]

fancyfought = prizefighting

mains = main – a principal channel, duct, or conductor for conveying water, sewage, etc. along the street of a town + mains (Slang) – cockfights + [Boxing’s main event]

doorweg = doorway – the opening or passage which a door serves to close or open; the space in a wall occupied by a door and its adjuncts + Weg (ger) = weg (Dutch) – way + doorweg (Dutch) – way through.

pikey = a vagrant, a tramp (i.e. King)
l.26 N pike: girl

ratepayer = taxpayer + the gentleman that (or who) pays the rent – a pig
l.27 St. Francis called all animals his brothers & sisters

sty = an enclosed place where swine are kept, usually a low shed with an uncovered forecourt + {Festy}

(notebook 1924): ‘stragglestreet’

Ilion = TROY – Ancient Troia, Ilion, on Ilium; city in the Troas, North-West Asia Minor, South of Dardanelles, modern Hissarlik; Troia, It “sow,” slang “whore” + Hic Stat Troia (l) – Here Stands Troy + qui sta Troia (it) – here is Troy + questa troia! (it) – what a whore! + tròia (it) – sow.

to pay off = to give all that is owing to and thus settle accounts with

doubloon – a Spanish gold coin (33 to 36 shillings)

villain = Originally, a low-born base-minded rustic; a man of ignoble ideas or instincts; in later use, an unprincipled or depraved scoundrel; a man naturally disposed to base or criminal actions, or deeply involved in the commission of disgraceful crimes [(notebook 1924): ‘villain’].

rumbler = one who makes a rumbling noise + [complainer]

rent = a tribute, tax, or similar charge, levied by or paid to a person

END Paragraph, Page 86.31

 

 

100 Words: A few words about the personal exploration of this month’s text 

[These entries are somewhat random, thoughts that arise from reading the text and brief research about the page. These are hardly intended to be academic criticism.]

[Flaubert’s The Temptation of Saint Antony might echo here for some readers. Antony wasn’t the first Christian hermit but was most influential because of the writings of Saint Athanasius. Like Earwicker, the monk suffered temptations by women– one famously seductive, another an unwitting child. These were the Queen of Sheba (ALP) and his memory of the child Ammonaria, who, like Isuelt, kindles an unnatural appetite. Each hero banishes himself to a necropolis, then a ruin (or dump). Like the cad’s torment of Earwicker, Hilarion, a former disciple, taunts Antony. The dual natures of HCE play havoc with his soul; Antony is called on to fight against the Arian heresy, supporting Christ’s dual nature. Finally, pigs establish HCE’s roles here; Antony’s relationship with pigs is also both enriching and debasing. Some reports say the pig represents temptation. Others say the pig represents Antony’s intercession against skin diseases or the plague of Ergotism. Antony worked with both afflictions. He treated skin disease with pork fat.]

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