(U) Ulysses, “Eumaeus,” Episode 16~pp 596-649.

copyright (c) don ward 2020

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses

  • Title: Eumaeus
  • Scene: The Shelter
  • Time: 1 a.m.
  • Organ: Nerves
  • Art: Navigation
  • Colour: (none)
  • Symbol: Sailors
  • Technic: Narrative (old)

Favorite After-Hours Quotes among Many

You frittered away your time,” he very sensibly maintained, “and health and also character besides which the squandermania of the thing, fast women of the demimonde ran away with a lot of (pounds, shillings, and pence) into the bargain and the greatest danger of all was who you got drunk with though….

The Narrator’s report of Bloom’s advice to Stephen

 

—And that one was Judas, Stephen said, who up to then had said nothing whatsoever of any kind.

Stephen regarding Lynch

 

and women would and did too a man’s similar garments initialed with Bewley and Draper’s marking ink (hers were, that is) if they really loved him, that is to say, love me, love my dirty shirt.

Bloom’s Musings on Laundry and Love

 

—But I suspect, Stephen interrupted, that Ireland must be important because it belongs to me.

A prophetic statement from the most-Irish of authors

 

People could put up with being bitten by a wolf but what properly riled them was a bite from a sheep.

Bloom revels at his victory over The Citizen

 

—She is a bad merchant. She buys dear and sells cheap.” 

Bloom on prostitution

 

—Come. It’s not far. Lean on me.

Neither Jew nor Christian, Bloom the Good Samaritan

 

What’s Important?

copyright @don ward, 2020

 

(U) Ulysses, “Ithaca,” Episode 17~pp 651- 720

copyright (c) don ward 2020

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses

  • Title: Ithaca
  • Scene: The House
  • Time: 2 a.m.
  • Organ: Skeleton
  • Art: Science
  • Colour: (none)
  • Symbol: Comets
  • Technic: Catechism (impersonal)

Several favorites among many astronomical quotes

“ …heterogeneous society of arbitrary classes, incessantly rearranged in terms of greater and lesser social inequality, of unbiassed homogeneous indisputable justice, tempered with mitigants of the widest possible latitude but exactable to the uttermost farthing with confiscation of estate, real and personal, to the crown. Loyal to the highest constituted power in the land, actuated by an innate love of rectitude his aims would be the strict maintenance of public order, the repression of many abuses though not of all simultaneously (every measure of reform or retrenchment being a preliminary solution to be contained by fluxion in the final solution), the upholding of the letter of the law (common, statute and law merchant) against all traversers in covin and trespassers acting in contravention of bylaws and regulations, all resuscitators (by trespass and petty larceny of kindlings) of venville rights, obsolete by desuetude, all orotund instigators of international persecution,….”

Bloom’s utopia

“ She disliked umbrella with rain, he liked woman with umbrella, she disliked new hat with rain, he liked woman with new hat, he bought new hat with rain, she carried umbrella with new hat.”

Bloom on managing Molly

“ That as a competent keyless citizen he had proceeded energetically from the unknown to the known through the incertitude of the void..”

A summary of the access to 7 Eccles Street– and of Bloom’s day in Dublin

What’s Important

The attached WordCloud created courtesy of WordCloud.com shows the incidence of important words appearing in the post about this episode. Frequency may signify importance.

(N) SESIONES FINNEGANS WAKE~ A Reading and Discussion Online from Lima, Peru 15 Febrero 10PM Lima (UTC -5/Greenwich Mean Time, 3AM martes 16 Febrero)

SESIONES FINNEGANS WAKE
Los invitamos a participar en la lectura y conversaciones en Sesiones virtuales del Finnegans Wake.
Este miércoles 15 de febrero nos reuniremos a las 10:00 p.m. hora de Lima, Perú. Conversaremos sobre el Capítulo 2 del Libro I del Finnegans Wake.
Para este tercera de las Sesiones Finnegans Wake leeremos la traducción anotada de Juan Díaz Victoria. Compartimos el PDF del Cap. 2, autorización del autor, en el linK: https://www.facebook.com/groups/429344461988390/permalink/709634180626082/

En el Y en la pestaña Archivos del grupo de Facebook: Sesiones Finnegans Wake podrán encontrar el Cap. 1.
Están cordialmente a participar en la conversación o a asistir como oyentes.

 

 

FINNEGANS WAKE SESSIONS~ A Reading and Discussion Online from Lima, Peru February 15, 10PM Lima (UTC -5/Greenwich Mean Time, 3 AM Tuesday, February 16)

We invite you to participate in the reading and conversations in virtual sessions of Finnegans Wake.
This Wednesday, February 15, we will meet at 10:00 p.m. Lima, Peru time. We will discuss Chapter 2 of Book I of Finnegans Wake.
For this third of the Finnegans Wake Sessions, we will read the annotated translation by Juan Díaz Victoria. We share the PDF of Ch. 2, author’s permission, in the link: https://www.facebook.com/groups/429344461988390/permalink/709634180626082/

And in the Archives tab of the Facebook group: Finnegans Wake Sessions you can find Chapter 1.
You are cordially invited to participate in the conversation or to attend as a listener.

Translated with DeepL.

(FW) Finnegans Wake: Throwing Whimsy around Like Blazes pp. 88.04- 89.01

Contents

Log

A Key to Pagination

[Page nn-] The page begun at the previous monthly session but not completed.

[Page nn] A full page completed.

[Page nn+] a page with one paragraph completed but the page incomplete.

Sources

  • Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake
  • Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake
  • Combined Lexicon and Occasional Summaries from Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com) and Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake 

100 Words

[Note: My speculation will always appear in brackets so that you can easily ignore it.]

Log

The cruise got underway at Book I, Chapter 4, Page 88.04 with the sentence concluding “…child’s altar.”  We docked again at 89.01 (“…place.).

Sources

Pages 88.04- 89.01

Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake

Campbell and Robinson translate: “Accordingly the mixer was bluntly cross-examined, as follows: ‘Was the witness one of those for whom the audible-visible-gnosible-edible world existed? Was he sure about the names of the parties involved in this king and blouseman business? How had the green-eyed mister acquired the B.A.? Did the initial letters of all his names add up to HERE COMES EVERYBODY?…(89)….'”

 

William York Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake

[The quote that follows from Tindall’s text is better appreciated with the following quote not from the Skeleton Key but from the text of Finnegans Wake: “And with tumblerous legs, redipnomi-nated Helmingham Erchenwyne Rutter Egbert Crumwall Odin Maximus Esme Saxon Esa Vercingetorix Ethelwulf Rupprecht Ydwalla Bentley Osmund Dysart Yggdrasselmann?” I am emboldened to embold.]

“…the witness relies on his senses for what happens in the audible-visible-possible-edible world.” Is he certain of “this king and a blouseman [cf. 63.16] business?” As certain “as cad could be” (86:32-88.13). What is O’Donnell’s name? Is it “Helmingham Erchenwyne… Yggdrasselmann?” (Take the 18 initials of this enormous name and you get HERE COMES EVERYBODY, cf. 32.18. Take the initials of this reduction and you get H.C.E.) “A stoker [Bram or devil?] temptated by evesdripping aginst the driver who was a witness as well?” This loaded question, bringing up Shem the Jehu (cf. 53.8) leads to the twins by way of The Comedy of Errors and the Prankqueen’s riddle about “porterpease.” “Peacisely” (88.80-89.4) (Tindall 88).

 

Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com)
and
Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake [Entries below introduced by line numbers “l n.nn” and italicized]

Page 88.04

 

in the best = in the best possible way, manner or condition 

basel = the alleged name according to Holinshed (and copyists down to the present day) of certain pieces of money abrogated by Henry II., of which numismatists have no knowledge.

to boot = in addition, over and above, besides + Baselbut (ger) – region around Basel.

l.6. Gautier’ je suis un homme pour qui le monde visible existe’ [he was one of those lucky cocks for whom the audible-visiblegnosibleedible world existed]
for whom the audible-visible…= Travers Smith: Psychic Messages from Oscar Wilde 6: ‘I was always one of those for whom the visible world existed’.
gnosible = gnosa (gr) – knowledge

l.7 L conatum: effort, impulse; cogitabundus: thoughtful
conatively = in a conative (having the characteristics of the apparently volitional acts; exertive, striving, expessive of endeavour) manner + conatum (l) – undertaking, attempt, venture, hazard.
cogitabundantly = cogitabund – musing, meditating, deep in thought

l.9 GR morphoō: form; GR melos: music; GR sophos: wise; GR pan: all

morphomelosophopankreas (gr) – flesh-all-shaped-skillfully-by-music + morpho (gr) – to shape, form + melos (gr) – music + sophos (gr) – skilled + pan (gr) – all, everything + kreas (gr) – flesh, meat + pankreas (gr) – “all meat”: pancreas.

l.10 [Pavlov’s dogs]

l.12 G Lüge: lie
lug = ear
truie (fr) = sow
(notebook 1923): ‘This King Business’

pediculous = pediculous – infested with lice, lousy + perfectly
l.13 belie
Certified? = “Sure?”

morbus = disease + Morbus (l) – “Disease”: a deity (personification) + morbus pediculosus (l) – “lousy disease”: ancient disease, in which the body swarmed with lice.
O’Somebody= William Shakespeare: Othello + telo (Serbian) – body.
A’Quite = quite – completely, wholly, altogether, entirely
Szerday = szerda (Hungarian) – Wednesday + sreda (Serbian) – Wednesday

satyr = one of a class of woodland gods or demons, in form partly human and partly bestial, supposed to be the companions of Bacchus.
greeneyed = William Shakespeare: Othello III.3.165-166: ‘O, beware, my lord, of jealousy! It is the green-eyed monster’.

poll = Irish Independent 5 Jun 1924, 5/4: ‘West Cork Horror’: (a police sergeant testifying in a trial of murder and dismemberment of a farmer by most of his family members) ‘Witness took the head out of a sack and turned an electric torch on it, and asked Leary could he identify it… “I am not sure, but it is like his poll” ‘[(notebook 1924): ‘it’s like his poll’].
l.16 poll: pass in ordinary B.A.
crossgrained = given to opposition, contrarious, perverse, queer tempered + (notebook 1924): ‘a coarsegrained person with odd hips & twitching mouth’ → Freeman’s Journal 6 Jun 1924, 7/1: ‘”Wicked Fast Woman”‘: (in a libel trial) ‘Mrs Copeman… said Miss Thurburn signed a letter sent to her in which there was a reference to “a coarse-grained person with two left feet, odd hips, and twitching eyes”‘.

trapper = one who sets traps; spec. one engaged in trapping wild animals for their furs.
l.17 mighty; Du oog:eye; ears; Inquiline: commensal; It ‘naso inquilino’ for naso aquilino’, common blunder of uneducated people
murteus (l) = dark, brown + (notebook 1924): ‘Murty’.
oog (Dutch) = eye.
inquiline = an animal which lives in the nest or abode of another + aquiline – eaglelike (esp. of the nose) + inquilino (it) – tenant + ‘naso Italian ‘naso inquilino’ for ‘naso aquilino’ (common blunder of people who speak with affectation).

nase = nose
twithcherous = twitch – to move (the skin, etc.) spasmodically or convulsively + treacherous

tenyerdfuul = tanyer (Hungarian) – plate
l.19 G Aas: carrion
aastalled = asztal (Hungarian) – table
Ballera = balra (Hungarian) – to the left
jobbera = jobbra (Hungarian) – to the right

major + majar (sp) – to be tiresome. [ also Magyar = people who settled in Hungary in the 9th Century]
bore – a tiresome or uncongenial person; one who wearies or worries + magyar bor (Hungarian) – Hungarian wine.
Iguines = I guess + igenis (Hungarian) – yes indeed
with – …” And with / a stopper head, bottle shoulders, a barrel (belly) ^bauck^ and / tumblerous legs”… (The words preceding “tumblerous” are carried on with only one change (“belly” –> “bauck”); by level 9 they make up exactly one line of the marked pages of transition 4 prepared for the typesetter of Finnegans Wake, namely 46.209.35. The line is skipped in the typesetting of the first galley proofs (49.117.31), and should surely be thought of as part of Joyce’s intention; I propose it as an emendation. One notices how much better the rhythm and clearer the meaning with it restored) (Bill Cadbury, 14 Oct. 1992) + (The FW galley printer omits an entire line, line 35 from the transition overlay (JJA 46:209), and one in which Joyce even changes a word (bauck for belly), not destroying the question-anwer series (as in the next omission) but leaving out essential information pointing to publican HCE as the litigating party turned prosecuted (as in the Oscar Wilde case). (At least I have the impression that such turnabouts happen here.) (Robbert-Jan Henkes, 18 May 2002)
tumblerous = tumble – to stumble by tripping over an object
redipnominated = redip – to rebaptize

l.21 Acrostic: HERE COMES EVERYBODY; Egbert: king of W. Saxons
Erchenwyne = erchwyn (Welsh) – side, bedside
Egbert = [Humpty Dumpty]

Vercingetorix = (d. 46) – Gallic chieftain who revolted against Julius Caesar  
Ethelwulf = Ethelwulf – king of the West Saxons
Rupprecht = Rupert, Prince (1619-82) – nephew of Charles I, for whom he fought bravely in the Great Rebellion.

l.23 Dysart O’Dea, 1318; holly and ivy
Yggdrasselmann = YGGDRASIL – The “world-tree” of Norse myth, an evergreen ash tree whose roots, trunk, and branches bind together hell, earth, and heaven. Its 3 roots go down into the realm of death, the realm of the giants, and Asgard, the realm of the gods. Beneath it the 3 Normans live by the Spring of Fate. “Ygg” is one of the names of Odin.  

l.25 daffodils
between the deffodates and the dumb scene = phrase between the devil and the deep sea

waapreesing = address – to speak or write to (someone) as (the title or name specified)
the renting of his rock = Matthew 27:51: ‘and the rocks rent’
l.26 I de bholóig: of an ox; ON Ragnarok: fate of the gods

Vuncouverers = Vancouver, George (1738-78) – English explorer for whom a Canadian city is named.  
l.27 uncles

awhits = awhit – to a very small extent, a very little + Thomas Moore: song Fairest! Put on Awhile [air: Cummilum].
Yubeti = you bet it
l.28 J yube: night; s Cummilium; Ostman: Viking
Cumbilum comes = kingdom come – (from the clause thy kingdom come in the Lord’s Prayer) heaven or paradise; the next world + cumbalum (l) – cymbal.

thingabossers = thingumbob – Used (in undignified speech) to indicate vaguely a thing (or person) of which the speaker cannot at the moment recall the name, or which he is at a loss or does not care to specify precisely; a ‘what-you-may-call-it’.
l.29 Thing: Viking Council
hvad = (Danish) – eh? what? 
refresqued = refreshed + fresque (fr) – fresco.

gourgling = gurgling – that gurgles; emitting a sound as of bubbling liquid or purling water + song ‘There is a green island In lone Gougane Barra’ + Gougane Barra (Irish: Guagán Barra, meaning “Barra’s retreat enclosed by mountains”) is a settlement, west of Macroom in County Cork, Ireland. The name Gougane Barra comes from Saint Finbarr, who is said to have built a monastery on an island in the lake nearby during the 6th century.
Lordedward = Fitzgerald, Lord Edward (1763-98) – conspirator of ’98, betrayed by Francis Higgins, captured by Major Sirr, married to Pamela.
l.30 s ‘There is a green island In lone Gougane Barre’; s ‘There is a happy land

philip = Sidney, Sir Philip (1554-86) – English poet, soldier whose father was lord deputy of Ireland. 500.21 refers to his alleged incest with his sister Mary, Countess of Pembroke. 
l.32 Sir Philip Crampton: D surgeon (his monument had drinking fountains attached)
showeradown = Sheridan, Philip Henry (1831-88) – American Union general. 

l.33 The Five Lamps: 5-way junction, D; Portland Row adjoins; Fi portteri; William & Mary; Virgin
Wirrgeling = Virgin Mary + P. Vergilius Maro – Roman epic poet + virkelig (Danish) – real.

laving = lave – to wash, bathe + living + laving (Anglo-Irish Pronunciation) – leaving.
l.34 Black Pool: trans. of ‘Dublin’

Tem = creator god in The Book of the Dead

butt = butt – to strike with head or horns + bet
anytom = any time +[any Tom, Dick, or Harry]

END Page 86 

 

Page 89.01

End of Sentence [“…place.”]

End

 

 

100 Words: A few words about the personal exploration of this month’s text 

[These entries are somewhat random, thoughts that arise from reading the text and brief research about the page. These are hardly intended to be academic criticism.]

[ Line 29 offers us “thingabossers.” The Glosses indicate this can refer to a non-specific thing but could also mean a person. We might think the Viking Thinkmote reflects something personal because it was the place of democratic gatherings. In fact, the monolith is most impersonal marker because our own democracies evolved to be the least human institutions. Monarchies, dictatorships, and cults may be slavery, but at least we know who to blame. The thing-centric “thingabosser” is the result of Nordic-northern origins (Saxons included). This is the helix-mix that gave us IKEA and ABBA automatons.

In 1942, the Brits turned the tide against personalized, cultish Fascism by personalizing the impersonalizable war machine. Singer Gracie Fields did this by inspiring those sheltered in the underground from the bombings. She sang…

“It’s a ticklish sort of job making a thing for a thing-ummy-bob,
Especially when you don’t know what it’s for.
But it’s the girl that makes the thing that drills the hole that holds the ring
That makes the thing-ummy-bob that makes the engines roar.
And it’s the girl that makes the thing that holds the oil that oils the ring
That makes the thing-ummy-bob that’s going win the war.
It is ‘n all.”

Personalists, if any remained, would delight to find “MY” in the belly of the thing-umMY-bob. In their Finest Hour, Brits personalized the “thingabosser.” Mediterranean passion, it seems, never surrendered the personal to the impersonal. Rather than depersonalize people, they personalize machines.

In memories of my childhood among Italians, first and second generation, the phrase “como si chiama” (GOmo say GIam) served both man or motor, girl or gadget. It translated equally well as “whatchamacallit” or “whositz.”]

 

 

(N) Andreas Flack Invites You to His Read-Along Audio of Finnegans Wake, Gigantic and Musical, Chapter 1

The first thing people will tell you about Finnegans Wake is that you have to read it aloud. Still, it wasn’t until I heard the recording of Joyce himself that I realized that there might be some overarching melody to it. So I decided to embark upon a quest of finding it. It took over 800 attempts and about two months to complete chapter 1, but the first version is now available for listening and reading along. Work on the next chapters has started, and my ambition is to gradually complete the cycle and to make it available online, where all of you are invited to point out my many mistakes, and to offer your insights.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pejk1cBp8kA&list=PLYVw70y7y2Ro1DTep6fxwzJuYv981Lep0

 

 

 

 

(FW) Finnegans Wake: Throwing Whimsy around Like Blazes p 86.32- 88.04

Contents

Log

A Key to Pagination

[Page nn-] The page begun at the previous monthly session but not completed.

[Page nn] A full page completed.

[Page nn+] a page with one paragraph completed but the page incomplete.

Sources

  • Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake
  • Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake
  • Combined Lexicon and Occasional Summaries from Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com) and Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake 

100 Words

[Note: My speculation will always appear in brackets so that you can easily ignore it.]

Log

The cruise got underway at Book I, Chapter 4, Page 86.32, and docked again at 88.04.

Sources

Pages 86.32- 88.04

Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake

“Remarkable evidence was given, anon, by eye, ear, nose, and throat witness [Shem], who (87) stated that he was pleased to remember the history – making episode. One thing, he declared, which particularly struck him and his two companions [the Three Soldiers], though there’s not to reason why, 11, was how Hyacinth O’Donnell, B. A., With part of a dung-fork, on the fair green, at the hour of twenty-four o’clock, had sought to sack, sock, stab, and slaughter single-handed two of the old kings, Gush MacGale and Roaring O’Crian, Jr., both changelings and of no address; since which time there had been bad blood between the litigants, and no end of petty quarrels. The litigants, he said, had been egged on by their womenfolk. Hereupon there were cries and cat calls from the gallery. But it oozed out in cross – examination, that when and where the three partied ambush had been laid, (88) it had been quite dark (Campbell and Robinson 87-88).

11 Echoes from ”Lawn Tennyson’s” “ Charge of the Light Brigade” continually break through statements of the three soldier team and culminate in the Crimean war episodes of pp. 338-55.

William York Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake

The eye–year–nose–and–throat witness for the prosecution is a Shaun type, modeled on Dr. Oliver Gogerty (a specialist in nose, throat, and the rest) and Stanislaus Joyce, a “plain clothes priest.” When grilled by the attorney for the defense (a Shem type), this witness testifies that he saw, heard, and smelt Hyacinth O’Donnell, B. A., “a mixer end word painter,’ threatening to old kings, Gush Mac Gale and Roaring O’Crian, Jr., “both changelings… of no address and in noncommunicables.” Hyacinth O’Donnell is Festy King as reviver and liberator perhaps. As mixer and wordpainter he is a union of Shaun and Shem, who reappear in the royal “changelings.” Shem–Shaun is fighting with Shaun-Shem again as allusions to the Mookse and the Gripes, the Ondt and the Gracehoper, Mutt and Jute make as plain as anything around here.

The ” crossexanimation of the casehardened testis,” at once legal and genital, introduces the “treepartied ambush,”….

Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com)
and
Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake [Entries below introduced by line numbers “l n.nn” and italicized]

Page 86.32

l.32 Oliver St John Gogarty, ear, eye, nose & throat specialist

l.33 W.C.: water closet; Wesleyan Chapel; MacDonald’s Diary of the Parnell Commission abbreviates ‘Parnell witness’ P.W.
situate = situated
null null = (ger) – zero zero, sign for toilet

l.34 Sl square: latrine

peacegreen = peagreen – (of) a colour like that of fresh green peas, a nearly pure but not deep green.

END Page 86 

Page 87

grill = to torment with heat; to subject to severe questioning.
bumper = a cup or glass of wine, etc., filled to the brim, esp. when drunk as a toast + Thomas Moore: Irish Melodies: song One Bumper at Parting [air: Moll Roe in the Morning].

elicit = to extract, draw out (information) from a person by interrogation = [illicit]
l.2 solicitor

morse = the sea-horse or walrus + walrus moustache – a large moustache which overhangs the lips (thus resembling the whiskers of a walrus).
mustaccents = mustacci (it) – moustache + [of a foreign style + upturned]
gobbless = god bless + gob (gob) (geal) – beak, snout.
bonafides = (orig. used with agent nouns, or those involving some quality, as in ‘bona fide purchaser’, ‘bona fide poverty’, ‘bona fide traveller’.) Acting or done in good faith; sincere, genuine.
l.3 Norse; Fi musta: black; Ir. pubs once open on Sundays only to bona-fide travellers

l.4 ‘Please to remember The 5th of November Gunpowder, treason & plot’ (Guy Fawkes Day chant)

hatinaring = [ to throw one’s hat in the ring- seeking appointment or election] 
jiboulees = jubilee – the fiftieth anniversary of an event + giboulées d’avril (fr) – April showers.
Juno = Juno – Roman godess (daughter of Saturn, wife of Jupiter) + [suggests O’Casey’s play Juno and the Paycock about marriage, betrayal, incompetence, and shame]

ould lanxiety = = old + song ‘days of Auld Lang Syne’.
Rainmaker = rainmaker – a member of a tribal community believed or claiming to be able to procure rain by the use of magic + Pluvius (l) – epithet of Jupiter + [a professional such as a lawyer known for an ability to make good things happen]

decembs = decem (l) – ten + December (l) – tenth month of the Roman year + [unsuccessful Russian revolutionaries who wanted the repeal of serfdom]

ephemerides = an almanac or calendar of any kind; in early use esp. one containing astrological or meteorological predictions for each day of the period embraced.
l.7 ephemerides: diaries (now means astronomical almanacs)
profane = not possessing esoteric or expert knowledge + [degrading, disrespectful]
all one = alone
[Rainmaker – the Noah story of the great flood]
TOURNAY = City, 45 miles South-West of Brussels, Belgium + today 
Teamhair = (t’our) (geal) – Prospective Hill, Co. Meath, ancient seat of high king: anglic. Tara; distorted to Temora by Macpherson.
l.8 today, yesterday& tomorrow; Shem, Ham & Japhet [?]

pigstickularly = pigstick – to hunt the wild boar on a horseback with a spear stright + particularly
theirs not to reason why = their’s not to reason why – Tennyson, Charge of the Light Brigade: Their’s not to make reply, Their’s not to reason why, Their’s but to do and die.

patrified = [fear of father]; to see, hear, taste and smell = [Gogarty’s branch of medicine was ear, nose, and throat. He studied in Vienna.]

Hyacinth = Hyacinthus (l) – Laconian youth beloved by Apollo who accidentally killed him, the flower sprang from his blood. 
l.12 Hyacinthus: youth loved by Zeus & Apollo; Killed by Zeus
O’Donnell = O’Domhnaill (o’donel) (geal) – descendant of Domhnall (“world-mighty”) + (notebook 1924): 
B.A. = (notebook 1924): ‘BA’.
l.13 John Macdonald, B.A.: Diary of the Parnell Commission

calendar = a list or register of any kind
mixer = one that mixes (paint, drug…); a person marked by easy sociability; a trouble maker; a bartender.
wordpainter = wordpainter – a writer of vivid or graphic descriptive power

sivispace = si vis pacem (l) – if you want peace + si vis pacem, para bellum (l) – ‘if you would have peace, prepare for war’ (i.e. parabellum pistol) + civis (l) – citizen.
Gaeltact = Gaeltacht – a region in Ireland in which Irish is the vernacular; also, these regions collectively.

bullycassidy = BALLYCASSIDY – Town, County Fermanagh + BULLY ACRE – Ancient cemetery of Kilmainham, corner of SCR and Royal Hospital Road. Closed 1832 after thousands of burials in cholera epidemic + Baile Ui Chaiside (bolyi khoshidi) (geal) – Town of the Descendants of Caiside (“curled”); anglic. Ballycassidy.
l.15 Bully’s Acre: oldest D cemetary; bellicosity

friedhoffer = friedhof (ger) – cemetery
sack = to put (a person) in a sack to be drowned

Gush Mac Gale = ‘ghus Mac Cathail (gus mok kohil) (geal) – “-choice, son of Battle-mighty”.
O’Crian = O’Brian
l.18 crying; Lucan
changelings = changeling – a child secretly substituted for another in infancy; a half-witted person (arch.)
unlucalised = unlocalized – not fixed in, attached or restricted to, a certain locality

ever since = eversince – throughout all the time before or after a specified date
l.19 Wallop Fields (Vortigern v Saxons)

LEWES = The county town of Sussex, England. After Simon de Montfort defeated Henry III on 14 May 1264, he extracted from Henry the document called the “Mise of Lewes,” in which Henry promised to abide by the Magma Carta and other documents and customs limiting royal prerogative.
on the ground of = by reason of

boer (Dutch) = farmer
l.21 bears & bulls: speculators for falls& rises, respectively, on Stock Exchange; Bull Island

twoways = extending in two directions or dimensions
creepfoxed andt grousuppers = fox and grapes + [the ondt and the gracehoper, the ant and the grasshopper]

l.23 Gripes Mooske (152.15); Ondt Gracehoper (414.20)
nippy = Formerly, a waitress in one of the restaurants of J. Lyons & Co. Ltd., London; hence, any waitress; sharp, quick, active, nimble.
novelette = a story of moderate length having the characteristics of a novel + novelletta (it) – short story + [Violetta doomed courtesan of La Traviata]

meathe = a maggot, worm + Midhe (mi) (geal) – “Middle,” former fifth (royal) province, now Co. Meath, N.W. of Dublin.

congsmen = Conga (kunge) (geal) – “Strait,” religious settlement, Co. Mayo; anglic. Cong, where Ruaidhri O’Conchobhair, last high king, retired in old age + kingsman – a partisan of the king; a royalist; the King’s men: a name for the dramatic company otherwise known as ‘the King’s Majesty’s Servants’ under James I.

l.25 Roderick O’Connor died at Cong Abbey; Aran Islands; Annual coronation of King of Dalkey Island: burlesque ceremony
donalds = Domhnall (donel) (geal) – “World-mighty”
kings of the arans = king of arms – an officer of arms (herald) of the highest rank + ARAN ISLANDS – Islands off Galway Bay.
dalkeys = Dalkey, King of – “His facetious Majesty, King of Dalkey, King of Mugleins Sovereign of the Illustrious Order of the Periwinkle and the Lobster.” He was a figure in an 18th-century burlesque ceremony, which the English suppressed and the Free State revived.

mud = Mud Island, King of – hereditary robber chieftain who ruled a gang of smugglers and highwaymen. 
tory = TORY ISLAND – Island, 7 miles off North coast of County Donegal; The island was noted for its various clays, used for heat-resistant pottery. The islanders traditionally elected a “king.”
goat king = god king – a human ruler believed to be a god
Killorglin = Killorglin, Goat King of – Killorglin, Co. Kerry, holds a Puck Fair at Lammas. A male goat, called Puck, is king of the fair, is paraded, wreathed, driven out. 
l.26 Land of Hope and Glory;Kings of Mud Island, gang of desperadoes in Ballybough ca. 1650-1850; Tory Island, Co. Donegal, originally elected king; Puck, male goat, annually crowned at Killorglin Fair

egg = to provoke to action, incite, encourage

bowstrung = bowstring – to strangle with a bowstirng (the string of a bow)
l.28 Strongbow: leader of Anglo-Normans who invaded Ireland; Carthaginian women in 146 B.C. siege cut off their hair to make bowstrings
Carrothagenuine = CARTHAGE – Ancient Phoenician city, North Africa, on coast North-East of modern Tunis, noted for sea power and the Punic Wars with Rome. Cato the Elder proclaimed that Rome must destroy Carthage: “Delenda est Carthago.” An 18th-century theory held that the Irish people was of Carthaginian origin. The women of Carthage, at the final siege by the Romans, 146 B.C., cut off their hair to make bowstrings

petties = petticoats
l.29 Isod’s Tower, Essex St., D, demolished 1675.

thickset = set or placed close together; closely arranged
l.30 thickets

bohernabreen = bohereen – a narrow country road esp. in hilly country + BOHERNABREENA – Bóthar-na-Bruighne, “Road of the mansion.” Townland, road, and reservoir, 2 miles South of Tallaght in Glenasmole; named for the famous “Hostel of Da Derga,” destroyed by pirates ca 1st century AD. It was the site of a famous murder and execution in 1816: one Kearney and his 2 sons were hanged for the hatchet slaying of a gamekeeper. 
l.31 Bohernabreena, townland in Glenasmole, once wrongly thought the site of Da Dearga’s hostel
bank from Banagher = to bang banagher – to surpass everything + BANAGHER – Village, County Offaly, on Shannon River. To anything unusual, people say, “Well, that bangs Banagher” (P W Joyce). 
Mick = Irishman + Mic (mik) (geal) – Son; Mr. in Mac names

O’Donner = O’Donnabhair (o’donawir) (geal) – descendant of Donnabhar (“brown eyebrow”) + song O’Donnell abú.
l.32 O’Donnell abu: O’Donnell to victory
Ay = Ah! O! (now the common northern exclamation of surprise, invocation, earnestness).
relics – the remains of a person; the body, or part of the body, of one deceased + relics (Slang) – male sex organs.
bu = boo – a sound imitating the lowing of oxen; also used to express contempt, disapprobation, aversion. 
Use the tongue = to give tongue – properly of a hound: to give forth its voice when on the scent or in sight of the quarry. Also transf. of persons.

mor = more
l.33 I tungc mór: big push
ooze – to pass as through pores or minute interstices, and so slowly or gradually
deadman – corpse + Joyce’s note: ‘deadmen’s dark scenery court’ → Douglas: London Street Games 5: ‘Dead Man’s Rise (also called Dead Man’s Dark Scenery or Coat) is one of these jacket-games, where one party has to hide, covered up in their coats’.

crossexanimation = crossexamination – a careful examination + exanimatio (l) – terror.
casehardened = case hardened – insensible, callous [(notebook 1924): ‘casehardened’]
l. 34 case-hardened: hardened on the surface
testis (l) = a witness; a testicle

knife of knifes = night of nights
l.35 night of nights
threeparted = having three parts, tripartite

l.36 speaking
twixt = between

END Page 87

PAGE 88

Waterhose’s Meddle Europeic Time = WATERHOUSE AND CO – Silversmiths, jewellers, and watchmakers, South side of Dame Street. Projecting at right angles over the sidewalk, Waterhouse’s clock spelled out its name (clockwise, naturally) from “W” at “3.”
Stop and Think = Joyce’s note: ‘Stop & think!’

l.2 HCE; L vivens; being green; appletree
evervirens = environs – the outskirts, surrounding districts, of a town + sempervirens (l) – evergreen.
abfalltree = Apfel (ger) – apple + Abfall (ger) – garbage; apostasy + [the Garden of Eden]
auld = old + all

widowed – deprived of a partner; deserted, solitary [(notebook 1924): ‘(the widowed moon)’].

END Sentence 88.04

 

 

100 Words: A few words about the personal exploration of this month’s text 

[These entries are somewhat random, thoughts that arise from reading the text and brief research about the page. These are hardly intended to be academic criticism.]

[Since “An Encounter” (first published in 1905), Joyce considered the abandoned Norse settlement of Dalkey Island (“kings of the arans and the dalkeys”) with its comic king a symbolic locale. Dalkey is near the Forty Foot Hole of Ulysses’ Telemachus episode and the site of the first of the novel’s many drownings. In “An Encounter,” Joyce’s two young adventurers risk passing Mud Island’s once thug kingdom (“Mudford”), where for two hundred years, constables feared to tread. Armed with a slingshot, the boys also skirted the dueling grounds. The treacherous route included the ground where Brian Boru died driving the Danes from Clontarf. The Murphy-Smith expedition crossed quays that were plains of mud when Vikings dragged longboats ashore. They crossed the site of the Thingmote, once maintained by a hereditary “godi,” both chief and priest-like neo-Dane HCE. The boys dream of sailing recklessly off on a Scandanavian three-master in the company of a green-eyed seaman. Innocence endangered, pedophile engaged, the schoolboys find themselves scurrying home before nightfall and the onset of Earwicker’s dreamworld. Earwicker, randy as Puck, “the goat king of Killorglin.”]

(U) Ulysses, “Circe,” Episode 15~pp 422-593.

copyrght @ don ward 2020

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses.

  • Title: Circe
  • Scene: The Brothel
  • Time: 12 midnight
  • Organ: Locomotor Apparatus
  • Art: Magic
  • Colour: (none)
  • Symbol: Whore
  • Technic: Hallucination

A Few Transformative Quotes among Many

Free money, free rent, free love and a free lay church in a free lay state.

Bloom’s Campaign Slogan for His New Utopia

Belial! Laemlein of Istria, the false Messiah! Abulafia! Recant!

Mastiansky and Citron condemn Bloom

  Shipmates, companions in disastrous time, oh my dear friends, where Dawn dies, and the West,  and where are the great sun, light of men, may go  under the earth by night, and where he rises.

Odysseus to his men after landing on Kirkê’s island

  THE BEATITUDES: _(Incoherently)_ Beer beef battledog buybull businum barnum buggerum bishop.

Bloomsday Blessed Bs

  Beware of the flapper and bogus mournful. Lily of the alley.

A Nighttown Warning

  I’m very fond of what I like.

The Wisdom of Particular Zoe

What’s Important?



The attached WordCloud created courtesy of WordCloud.com shows the incidence of important words appearing in the post about this episode. Frequency may signify importance.

(FW) Finnegans Wake: Throwing Whimsy around Like Blazes p 85.20- 86.31

Contents

Log

A Key to Pagination

[Page nn-] The page begun at the previous monthly session but not completed.

[Page nn] A full page completed.

[Page nn+] a page with one paragraph completed but the page incomplete.

Sources

  • Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake
  • Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake
  • Combined Lexicon and Occasional Summaries from Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com) and Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake 

100 Words

[Note: My speculation will always appear in brackets so that you can easily ignore it.]

Log

 The cruise got underway at Book I, Chapter 4, Page 85.20, and docked again at 86.31.

Sources

Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake

Page 85.20- 86.31

The authors provide some assistance: “The Crown attempted to prove that King, alías Crowbar, impersonating a chimney sweep, having rubbed mud on his face to disguise himself, and gone to the fair in Mudford, on a Thursday, under the assumed names of Tykingfest and Rabwore { i.e., Festy King and Crowbar, twisted about} with a pedigree pig and a hyacinth. The court gathering, convened to help the Irish Muck look his brother Dane in the face and attended by large numbers in spite of the deluge, was distinctly of the scattery kind (Campbell and Robinson 87).

William York Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake

Tindall as the court recorder: Suddenly we are at Earwicker’s trial at the Old Bailey in London for whatever he did in the Park in Dublin. As Festy King in the “dry dock” (raised from his watery grave), H.C. E. seems as composite as Hosty, a mixture of father and son. (Festus, joyful or merry in Latin, describes the Prankquean’s Hilary or Shem.Cf. “Finnerty the Festive,” 41.24) P.C. Robort (police constable) testifies for the crown that King, alias Crowbar ( C. Robort?), disguising his face with “clanetourf” (from Clane and Clontarf– not Balaklava), assumed the names of Tykingfest (Festy King) and Rabworc (Crowbar) at the Mudford fair with an unlicensed blind pig and a hyacinth, after having landed, two by two, from Noah’s ark– after the deluge, into the mud (85.23-86.31) (Tindall 87)

Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com)
and
Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake [Entries below introduced by line numbers “l n.nn” and italicized]

Page 85.20

headway – advance, progress (in general) + FDV: As if that would not do but little headway was made when a countryman Festy King who gave an address in Monaghan Joyce Country in the heart of a wellfamed poteen district was subsequently brought up on an improper improperly framed indictment of both courts. It was attempted to show that having come to rubbed some dirt on his face to disguise himself he was at the door fair of a Monday with a pig this animal ate some of the doorpost, King selling it because it _____, ate the woodwork off her sty. An eyewitness said he remembered the fifth of November [which was going to go down in the annals of history& one thing that particularly struck him was he saw or heard unquestionably a man named Pat O’Donnell beat & murder another of the Kings, Simon, but when the ambush was laid there was not as much light as wd light dima child’s altar and to the perplexedly uncondemnatory bench, the first King, Festy, declared through his interpreter on his oath & before God & their honours that he did not fire a stone either before or after he was born up to that day & this he supplemented had the neck to supplement in the same language by postasserting that he wd impart he might never ask to see sight or light of this world or the next world [or any other world] if ever he took or threw the sign of a stone either before or after being baptised up to that blessed & holy hour.

Mam (mam) (geal) – Breach, Mountain pass; village, Co. Galway + Joyce’s note: ‘Interpreter / – Maam’; † ‘Ireland at the Bar’, 197: Several years ago a sensational trial was held in Ireland. In a lonely place in a western province, called Maamtrasna, a murder was committed. Four of five townsmen, all belonging to the ancient tribe of the Joyces, were arrested. The oldest of them, the seventy year old Myles Joyce, was the prime suspect. Public opinion at the time thought him innocent and today considers him a martyr. Neither the old man nor the others accused knew English. The court had to resort to the services of an interpreter. The questioning, conducted through the interpreter, was at times comic and at times tragic. On one side was the excessively ceremonious interpreter, on the other the patriarch of a miserable tribe unused to civilized customs, who seemed stupefied by all the judicial ceremony.[…] The figure of this dumbfounded old man, a remnant of a civilization not ours, deaf and dumb before his judge, is a symbol of the Irish nation at the bar of public opinion + ‘Maamtrasna, is anglicised as ‘Maam Cross’.
l.23 Maamtrasna: scene of murders in 1882 for which Myles Joyce executed after unsound trial; Festus King: shop in Clifden Con. Galway

Festy = (notebook 1922-23): ‘Festus Joyce, Recess’
tar and feather = to smear with tar and then cover with feathers: a punishment sometimes inflicted by a mob (esp. in U.S.) on an unpopular or scandalous character.

l. 25 G Mansch: mixture; Romansch language

MAYO OF THE SAXONS – “Yew-Plain of the Saxons”: Monastery, now ruins and site of village of Mayo 3 miles South of Balla, County Mayo; est. 7th century by St Colman for English monks from Inishbofin following disputes between Irish and English monks there [(notebook 1923): ‘Mayo of the Saxons’].

foulfamed = far famed – that is famed to a great distance, well known

potheen (Anglo-Irish) = illicit whiskey

hale = to draw up, to constrain or draw forcibly to, to bring in violently, drag in.

Old Bailey = the seat of the Central Criminal Court in London {Earwicker at the Old Bailey courhouse in London}

calends = the first day of any month in the Roman calendar
Mars = March
l.27 calends of March: 1 March, 1st day of Roman year

equinoxious = equinox – the condition of having the days and nights of equal length. Also fig.+ [poisonous]

fetch = something that looks exactly like another, counterpart; the phantom double of a living person appearing as an omen of the death; a contrivance, dodge, trick + “One man’s meat is another man’s poison” (‘meat’ is often to be understood in the slang sense of ‘penis’) + poisson (fr) – fish.

cushat = the wood-pigeon or ring-dove + to fly pigeons (Slang) – to steal coal.

ouveralls = overalls – an external covering, cloak, waterproof, trousers + ouver = over.

fesses – pl. of fess – a broad bar drawn horizontally across the middle of a heraldic field + fesses (fr) – buttocks + far fesso (it) – to make a fool of someone + [confesses]

immodst = in mids – amidst, in the middle (of)

Oyeh = Oje! (ger) – oh dear! + [Oyez, oyez, oyez = the summons to the court]
l.31 ‘oyez!’ opens court session

soaked = dull, lacking in animation; steeped, macerated; saturated, drenched; intoxicated.

methylate = to impregnate with methanol + methylated spirit – form in which alcohol is most commonly employed for industrial purposes.

in dry dock = inactive, unemployed; in quarantine, in hospital + dry dock – a dock that can be kept dry for use during the construction or repairing of ships + dock – the enclosure in a criminal court in which the prisoner is placed at his trial.

ambrosia (gr, l) = food of the goods + aureolus (l) – golden.
l.32 Ambrosius Aurelianus, semimythical champion, led Romanized Britons against Hengist in C5

Kersse’s = kersey – a coarse woolen cloth for hose and work clothes, homespun

fight shirt = nightshirt – a nightgown resembling a shirt
l.34 nightshirt (Parnell; 388.03)

straw = of the color of straw

souwester – a large oilskin or waterproof hat or cap worn by seamen to protect the head and neck during rough or wet weather.

corkscrew = resembling a corkscrew; spirally twisted; an imperfection in silk filaments.

trowswers = trousers

all out of the true = out of the blue – unexpectedly, without warning

torn up = to tear up – to pull asunder by force (esp. cloth or paper)

cymtrymanx = WALES – Principality of UK forming the wide peninsula on the West of the island of Britain. Lat, Cambria; Welsh, Cymry.  

bespoke – Of goods: Ordered to be made, as distinguished from ready-made + bespeak – to be the outward expression of; to indicate, give evidence of.
l.36 bespoke: tailor-made; Mamertine:medieval Roman prison

 mamertime = CARCER – The small prison North-East of the Forum in Rome where criminals were held pending trial. From medieval times called the “Mamertine prison.” + Mamer – Oscan name for Mars.

END Page 85

 

 

Page 86

exute = to strip (a person) of, to divest of + exutio (l) – an exclusion + [a venia] exutio (eccl. l) – they who are excluded from divine forgivenness, the utterly reprobate (St. Ambrose) + exutoire (fr) – outlet, release [(notebook 1924): ‘exutoire’].
l.1 L exutio: an exclusion; flowers of speech: L fluor: flow; fluorspar: native calcium fluoride; Constabulary

sparse = to spread or disseminate (a rumour, doctrine, etc.) + speach

(notebook 1924): ‘had the vocabulary royal Irish -‘ (dash dittoes’ vocabulary’)

padderjagmartin = Peter, Jack, Martin – in Swift’s Tale of a Tub, they are the Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran churches. In FW they are also the Three. 
l.2 tripartite; Piezo-electricity generated in quartz crystals by pressure

suet = suit

sulfeit = sulfate

copperas = copperas – protosulphates of copper, iron and zinc 
l.3 copperas: cupric, ferrous or zinc sulphate; quite

quatz = [quartz] + [quo tis = something given for quartz] 

chrystalisations = crystallization – the action of forming crystals, or of assuming a crystalline structure. + [cocoon]

Alum = a whitish transparent mineral salt, crystallizing in octahedrons + Adam
l.4 Adam and Eve; G Feuer anzustecken light a fire

to stick fire = to strike fire – to produce (fire, a spark) by percussion, esp. by the percussion of flint and steel + Joyce’s note: ‘stick fire’ + lit. Feuer anzustecken (ger) – to light a fire.

feacht = in fact + feacht (fyokht) (geal) – turn, time, occasion.
l.5 I feacht: turn, time, in fact

drip = Of a person or object: To have moisture or liquid falling off in drops; to be so copiously wet or saturated with as to shed drops; to complain, grumble.

pipkin = a small earthenware pot or pan, used chiefly in cookery

coold = cold + [the dead + Finn McCool]
l.6 Colertraine, town, Co. Derry, known for whiskey

crown = crown lawyer – a lawyer in the service of the Crown; a lawyer who practices in criminal cases.

P.C.  = police constable

Robort = policeman + [robot + abort = satellite]

elois = alias + FDV: It was attempted to show that having come to rubbed some dirt on his face to disguise himself he was at the door fair of a Monday with a pig this animal ate some of the doorpost, King selling it because it ______ ate the woodwork off her sty. An eyewitness said he remembered the fifth of November [which was going to go down in the annals of history& one thing that particularly struck him was he saw or heard unquestionably a man named Pat O’Donnell beat & murder another of the Kings, Simon, but when the ambush was laid there was not as much light as wd light dim a child’s altar and to the perplexedly uncondemnatory bench, the first King, Festy, declared through his interperter on his oath &before God & their honours that he did not fire a stone either before or after he was born up to that day & this he supplemented had the neck to supplement in the same language by postasserting that he wd impart he might never ask to see sight or light of this world or the next world [or any other world] if ever he took or threw the sign of a stone either before or after being baptised up to that blessed & holy hour.

crowbar = an iron bar with a wedge-shaped end + crowbar brigade (Slang) – Irish constabulary.

l.8 Cathal Crovdearg deposed Roderick O’Connor, last High King of Ireland; Malachy II succeeded Brian Boru as High King of Ireland
Meleky = milk + melecky (Arabic) – king + melekh (Hebrew) – king.

l.9 pieces; ALP; smear
peatsmoor = [bog]

plucks = pluck (Anglo-Irish) = pluc (pluk) (geal) – cheek

pussas = puss (Anglo-Irish) = pus (Irish) = pusa (puse) (geal) – lips, mouth
clanetourf = clane – clean + [The Battle of Clontarf] 
l.10 Clontard- clean turf; Clane, village, Co. Kildare

middlewhite fair in Mudford = fluor – a flow or flowing; pl. = flowers + (notebook 1924): ‘Eng. villages / White Ladies Aston / Martyr Worthy / Swine / Foulmire / Mucking / Mudford / Barton in the Beans / Great Snoring / Eggbuckland / Toft Monks / Nether Wallop / Toller Porcorum / Huish Champflower’.
l. 11 Middlewhite: a class of a pig; Thor

of a Thoorsday = of (Dublin Colloquial) – on (when referring to days of the week) + thoor (Anglo-Irish) – tower

feishts = feast + feis (fesh) (geal) – festival, convention.
l.12 I feiste: entertainment; G feist: fat; Festy King & Crowbar; Peter & Paul

Peeler = policeman

Rabworc = rab (rob) (geal) – hog

Anthony = the patron saint of swine heards + Anthony (Slang) – smallest or favourite pig of a litter.

tellafun book = telephone book

 ellegedly = allegedly 

unlicensed = unauthorized by license, lawless
l. 15 Erie; 3 brothers, Heber, Heremon & Ir, led Milesian invasion of Ireland

cry crack = to give up, to desist

paddlewicking = paddle wheel – a wheel used for propelling a boat or ship + song Paddy Whack (This old man, he played one, / He played knick-knack on my thumb. / With a knick-knack, paddy whack, / Give a dog a bone, / This old man came rolling home.) + paddywhack – a spank or spanking.

amadst = amidst – in or into the middle or centre of

suckling = suckling – an infant that is at the breast or is unweaned; a young animal that is suckled; esp. a sucking calf.

merrymeg = meg – woman, a country girl, boisterous woman

meddle = the action of meddling; a medley + middle
l.20 maelstrom

convene = to come together, to assemble; to cause to come together, to convoke [(notebook 1924): ‘convened’].

Prepostoral = pastoral – of or pertaining to shepherds or their occupation

muck = the dung of cattle (usually mixed with decomposing vegetable refuse) used for manure + muc (muk) (geal) – pig.
l.21 The Ir. Agricultural Organisation Society founded by Sir Horace Plunkett; pastoral; I muc: pig

look = Joyce’s note: ‘looked me in face’
l.22 (competition from Denmark as obstacle to Ir. bacon industry)
attend = to present oneself, for the purpose of taking some part in the proceedings, at a meeting for business, worship, instruction, entertainment; to turn the mind to, give consideration or pay heed to, regard, consider. 

Larry = confusion, noise, excitement
tospite = despite – in spite of
scattery = scattered, marked by scattering
bally – bloody (a vague epithet expressing anger, resentment, detestation) + Ballybricken Green in Waterford City was once a suburb where lived the pigjobbers who purchased the pigs for Waterford’s bacon factories (John Garvin) + (notebook 1924): ‘Ballybricken pigs (Waterford)’ → Freeman’s Journal 3 May 1924, 10/6: ‘By the Way’: ‘Not far from the picturesque and busy Quay at Waterford is the far-famed Ballybricken, the heart of the bacon industry, and the home of the best-known body of pig-buyers in Ireland’.
l.23 pig totem animal of Jews; Gr to spiti: the house

l.24 Scattery Island, C. Clare; Ballybrickan: suburb of Waterford once inhabited by the pig -brokers

cockofthewalking = cock of the walk – one that dominates a group or situation esp. overbaringly + [Mississippi River slang- toughest bargeman]

fancyfought = prizefighting

mains = main – a principal channel, duct, or conductor for conveying water, sewage, etc. along the street of a town + mains (Slang) – cockfights + [Boxing’s main event]

doorweg = doorway – the opening or passage which a door serves to close or open; the space in a wall occupied by a door and its adjuncts + Weg (ger) = weg (Dutch) – way + doorweg (Dutch) – way through.

pikey = a vagrant, a tramp (i.e. King)
l.26 N pike: girl

ratepayer = taxpayer + the gentleman that (or who) pays the rent – a pig
l.27 St. Francis called all animals his brothers & sisters

sty = an enclosed place where swine are kept, usually a low shed with an uncovered forecourt + {Festy}

(notebook 1924): ‘stragglestreet’

Ilion = TROY – Ancient Troia, Ilion, on Ilium; city in the Troas, North-West Asia Minor, South of Dardanelles, modern Hissarlik; Troia, It “sow,” slang “whore” + Hic Stat Troia (l) – Here Stands Troy + qui sta Troia (it) – here is Troy + questa troia! (it) – what a whore! + tròia (it) – sow.

to pay off = to give all that is owing to and thus settle accounts with

doubloon – a Spanish gold coin (33 to 36 shillings)

villain = Originally, a low-born base-minded rustic; a man of ignoble ideas or instincts; in later use, an unprincipled or depraved scoundrel; a man naturally disposed to base or criminal actions, or deeply involved in the commission of disgraceful crimes [(notebook 1924): ‘villain’].

rumbler = one who makes a rumbling noise + [complainer]

rent = a tribute, tax, or similar charge, levied by or paid to a person

END Paragraph, Page 86.31

 

 

100 Words: A few words about the personal exploration of this month’s text 

[These entries are somewhat random, thoughts that arise from reading the text and brief research about the page. These are hardly intended to be academic criticism.]

[Flaubert’s The Temptation of Saint Antony might echo here for some readers. Antony wasn’t the first Christian hermit but was most influential because of the writings of Saint Athanasius. Like Earwicker, the monk suffered temptations by women– one famously seductive, another an unwitting child. These were the Queen of Sheba (ALP) and his memory of the child Ammonaria, who, like Isuelt, kindles an unnatural appetite. Each hero banishes himself to a necropolis, then a ruin (or dump). Like the cad’s torment of Earwicker, Hilarion, a former disciple, taunts Antony. The dual natures of HCE play havoc with his soul; Antony is called on to fight against the Arian heresy, supporting Christ’s dual nature. Finally, pigs establish HCE’s roles here; Antony’s relationship with pigs is also both enriching and debasing. Some reports say the pig represents temptation. Others say the pig represents Antony’s intercession against skin diseases or the plague of Ergotism. Antony worked with both afflictions. He treated skin disease with pork fat.]

(FW) Finnegans Wake: Throwing Whimsy around Like Blazes pp. 84.28- 85.19

Contents

Log

A Key to Pagination

[Page nn-] The page begun at the previous monthly session but not completed.

[Page nn] A full page completed.

[Page nn+] a page with one paragraph completed but the page incomplete.

Sources

  • Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake
  • Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake
  • Combined Lexicon and Occasional Summaries from Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com) and Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake 

100 Words

[Note: My speculation will always appear in brackets so that you can easily ignore it.]

Log

 The cruise got underway at Book I, Chapter 4, Page 84.28, and docked again at 85.19.

Sources

Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake

Page 84.28- 85.19

The authors provide some assistance: “Now then, worming along gradually in our search for further evidence, we come to the problem of the political leanings and town pursuits of our forebear: (85) (1) As to his Pacific pursuits— (a) he was given to walking or circulating along the public thoroughfares; (b) when mistakenly ambushed, he had been on the brink of taking place upon a public seat by Butt’s Bridge, without intent to annoy: (Campbell and Robinson 87).

William York Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake

Tindall offers a similar summary but one that emphasizes different elements: “Now another version of the story: our ‘forebeer,’ having been almost ‘mistakenly ambushed’ in the Park, goes, like Parnell’s Butt to sit on Butt Bridge to think things over. It must have been as clear to him as it is to us that ‘little headway, if any, was made in solving the worlds not to be crime conundrum’ (84.36–85.22). Who is who and who does what, if anything, to whom, remain puzzling questions “(Tindall 87).

Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com)
and
Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake [Entries below introduced by line numbers “l n.nn” and italicized]

Page 84.28

Nowthen = Now + [ to continue {in telling a tale}]

ash = the ashen shaft or spear

brass = money in general, cash; Historically: The general name for all alloys of copper with tin or zinc. 

oust – Law. To put out of possession, eject, dispossess; to eject or expel from any place or position + (notebook 1924): ‘ousting of metals by metals’ → Haldane: Daedalus or Science and the Future 31: ‘the production of aluminium from clay… I do not think that even when this is accomplished aluminium will oust iron and steel as they ousted bronze and flint’.

earthborn = born on the earth; of earthly or mortal race, as opposed to angelic or divine + (notebook 1923): ‘Earthborn (terrigenae)’.

rockcrystal = transparent quartz

isinglass – a firm whitish semitransparent substance (being a comparatively pure form of gelatin) obtained from the sounds or airbladders of some fresh-water fishes, esp. the sturgeon.

Wurm (ger) = worm + worm – to move or progress sinuously like a worm; to make one’s way insidiously like a worm into (a person’s confidence, secret affairs, etc.) + [The Edict of Worms declared Luther a heretic]

saving – the action of rescuing or protecting + for one’s sake – on account of one’s interest in, or regard for (a person), out of consideration for. + [except for]

mother water – the liquid left after crystallization, e.g. of sea-salt + moddervater (Dutch) – muddy water + The Encyclopædia Britannica vol. XVI, ‘Lisbon’, 771b: (of the Aqueducto das Aguas Livres) ‘At the Lisbon end of the aqueduct is the Mae d’Agua (i.e. “Mother of Water”), containing a huge stone hall in the midst of which is the reservoir’. + [Anna Livia]

l.31 Dublin stone = Steyne: pillar erected by Vikings in D
Olympiad = a period of four years reckoned from one celebration of the Olympic games to the next, by which the ancient Greeks computed time, the year 776 b.c. being taken as the first year of the first Olympiad; a quadrennial celebration of the ancient Olympic Games.

thuddysickend = thousand
l.32 eleventh dynasty to reach that thuddysickend = 1132
Hamlaugh = Olaf, Danish prince, source of name Hamlet (Humphrey, Olaf, Oliver and Hamlet are all cognates of sorts; Humphrey = Irish, Amhlaoibh = Olaf = Old Norse, Olafr = Oliver; Irish, Amhlaoibh =Latin, Amlethus = French Hamlet).

boney = bony – abounding in bones; having large or prominent bones; big-boned + [Bonaparte]

pierced – punctured, perforated + first

paraflamme = parafuoco (it) – fire-guard + fiamme (it) – flames.

claptrap = language designed to catch applause; cheap showy sentiment. In modern use passing into sense’ nonsense, rubbish’.

fireguard = a protecting wire screen or grating before open fireplace, fender

to crop out = to come out, appear, or disclose itself incidentally + [outcrop = a raised area in a rock formation + a vein as of ore+ a promontory]

politish = politisch (ger) – political

forebeer = father

Dunelli = Dan Donnelly – an Irish champion prizefighter who in 1815 knocked out Cooper, the English champion. His footprints have been preserved somewhere or other in Ireland and his fossilized arm “is one of the major attractions of a Kilcullen hostelry” + el don de dunele (Venetian Italian Dialect) – the gift of women, a Don Juan + O’Donnghaile (o’douneli) (geal) – descendant of Donnghal (“brown-valor”).
l.36 Dunawly (Olaf’s fort) in Clondalkin, Co. D: Dunn, bass at Theatre Royal, D, called himself ‘Dunelli’; Venetial Dial el don de dunele; The gift of women, a Don Juan
thicked = thick – to become thick, thicken

END Page 84

 

 

Page 85

burral = (burel) (geal) – bit, jot + burial + lock, stock and barrel – the whole thing (the ‘whole thing’ in question when this phrase originated was a musket: the lock, or flintlock, which is the firing mechanism; the stock, which is the wooden butt-end of the gun; the barrel, i.e. a cylindrical object).

the black of your toenail = by the black of your nail (Anglo-Irish phrase) – only just
l.3 uddahveddahs = other fellows

mam = mom; madam + man + Maamtrasna – a valley in Joyce country, County Galway, and the scene of the murders of five members of a family named Joyce in 1882, for which ten men (five of whom were also called Joyce) were accused, of whom five were sentenced to life imprisonment and three executed (including the apparently-innocent Myles Joyce) after an unsound trial (including withheld documents, suppressed testimonies, etc.), in which the proceedings were carried out in English, while the accused spoke only Irish and their interpreter spoke a Donegal dialect, that at times was almost unintelligible to the accused (written about at length, with quite a few factual errors, in James Joyce’s “Ireland at the Bar”).

kayoed = knocked, knocked out

offhand = at once, straightaway; without previous thought or preparation

l.5 hyougono = Huguenot; Peter the Painter, anarchist, involved in Siege of Sidney St. hence, type of gun
Peter the Painter – Russian anarchist of the early 20th century + Joyce’s note: ‘Peter the Painter’ → Irish Times 2 Dec 1922, 7/8: ‘The attacking party were all armed with Service rifles, and some of them carried “Peter the Painters” and Smith and Wesson revolvers.

imprescriptable – not subject to prescription; that cannot in any circumstances be legally taken away or abandoned.

bellybone = Joyce’s note: ‘bellybone’
chuck = to throw with the hand with little action of the arm; to throw underhand; to toss; prob. at first said of throwing or tossing money, or anything light; now used somewhat playfully or contemptuously of heavy things, as suggesting that they are thrown with ease or contempt.
chum – a habitual companion, an associate, an intimate friend; In Australia: new chum, a fresh immigrant, a ‘greenhorn’; old chum, an old and experienced settler.
chuck and chance it = a derisive phrase used attrib. to describe wet-fly fishing.
umphrohibited = [forbidden by the authority or umpire]
semitary = semita (l) – path
thrufahrts = throughfare – a road, street, lane, or path forming a communication between two other roads or streets, or between two places; a public way unobstructed and open at both ends; esp. a main road or street + Durchfahrt (ger) – thoroughfare, passage.
l.10 to walk = to wit
curb = a massive ornamental fireplace fender + curb (Slang) – thief’s hook.

auxter = oxter – armpit + ULSTER – North province of Ireland. The arms of Ulster are a red right hand (lamh dearg) on a white shield (the arms of the O’Neils). + [The Auxiliaries or Auxies, a paramilitary unit of the Royal Irish Constabulary].
alpenstuch = alpenstock – a long staff pointed with iron, used in climbing the Alps, whence it has passed into general use in mountain climbing.

l..12 Ulster; [highly commendable exercise] = HCE

Acta legitima plebeia (l) – Daily record of the lawful public acts of the common people. Acta at Rome included Acta publica, Acta Senatus, Acta Diurna, Acta Triumphorum but no known Acta L. P. (O Hehir, Brendan; Dillon, John M. / A classical lexicon for Finnegans wake) + legitime (l) – lawful.
l.13 ALP
baulk = balk – to check, hinder, thwart (a person or his action)

to what = to wit

bare = (Danish) – just

Butt’s = BUTT BRIDGE – Aka Swivel Bridge. The last (and East-most) bridge as the Liffey flows except for the Loop Line Railway bridge. Erected 1879; named for the 19th-century politician Isaac Butt. 
l.15 blackpool = Dublin
to go west = of the sun; also fig., to die, perish, disappear + [also newspaperman Horace Greeley’s advice to young Americans]. 

naturlikevice = naturligvis (Danish) – naturally + likewise – in the like or same manner, similarly + [ nature likes vice]
l.16 Da naturliguis: of course

wrathbereaved = bereave – to deprive, rob, strip, dispossess (a person, etc., of a possession; Since 1650 mostly of immaterial possessions, life, hope, etc.) + [funeral wreath]

ringdove = a common European pigeon (Columba palumbus); also called ring-pigeon, wood-pigeon, cushat, or queest.
l. 17 wellbehaved

fearstung = fearstruck – struck with or overwhelmed by fear + (notebook 1924): ‘snake bites out of fear’ → Crawford: Thinking Black 252: ‘For who does not know that a snake never really attacks a man, only bites out of fear, and only because you have stumbled over him in error’ + [fearsome]
l.18 fearstung = fasting

l.19 (notebook 1924): ‘quite pleased at having other people’s weather’

END Paragraph, Page 85.19

 

 

100 Words: A few words about the personal exploration of this month’s text 

[These entries are somewhat random, thoughts that arise from reading the text and my brief research about the page. These are hardly intended to be academic criticism.]

[A Skeleton Key to Finnegans Wake means to provide an abridged translation of the text. I know nothing about Robinson’s work, but I know Campbell’s well enough. Campbell is what I’ll call a mythological anthropologist. He has a way of bringing modern meaning through millennia. Tindall is like the most insightful Stand-Up Comic. He takes a word or phrase and turns out a new juxta-peculiarity, like “forebeer” or “Butt’s Bridge.” He doesn’t dig around for what is there to expose it; that’s Campbell’s way. Tindall finds possibilities that can’t be proven to be “true”; no comic can prove a joke. WYT discovers artful connections to entertain us with limitless possibilities that live Finnegans Wake.]

 

(FW) Finnegans Wake: Throwing Whimsy around Like Blazes pp. 83.04-84.27

Contents

Log

A Key to Pagination

[Page nn-] The page begun at the previous monthly session but not completed.

[Page nn] A full page completed.

[Page nn+] a page with one paragraph completed but the page incomplete.

Sources

  • Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake
  • Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake
  • Combined Lexicon and Occasional Summaries from Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com) and Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake 

100 Words

[Note: My speculation will always appear in brackets so that you can easily ignore it.]

Log

 The cruise got underway at Book I, Chapter 4, Page 83.04, and docked again at 84.27.

Sources

Campbell and Robinson’s A Skeleton Key to Finnegan’s Wake

Page 83.04- 84.27

The authors summarize: “Then, pleased by the foretaste of all the whisky he would drink at the Red Cow, the Good Woman, Conway’s Inn, and Adam and Eve’s, he begged leave to depart. The queer mixture having exchanged the kiss of peace and concluded their Treaty of Cognac, the attackler turned fez in the (84) direction of Moscow, emitting a few horosho’s, {Russian “very well’s”} and levanted off with the seven and four to keep some crowplucking appointment, while the Dane, with a number of plumsized contusions, reported the occurrence, as best he could, to the nearest watch house” (Campbell and Robinson 86).

William York Tindall’s A Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake

Pages 83.04-84.27

“This conflict, although like that of Mooske with Gripes, is not unlike the American Civil War. Union Earwicker, back in his pub, tells the story of the “confederate fender” to the astonished drinkers. This story of self defience combines self defense with internal conflict, one of Earwicker’s sides against the other (82.4–84.27)” [Tindall 87].

Glosses of Finnegans Wake (finwake.com)
and
Roland McHugh’s Annotations to Finnegans Wake [Entries below introduced by line numbers “l n.nn” and italicized]

Page 83.04

rekindle – to kindle again, arouse again

gay gay + JJ + [John Jamison and James Joyce]; whisk-wigs = whiskey

strike him pink = strike me pink! – used as an e[x]pression of surprise or disbelief; forthright= fortright – strightforward, immediately, directly forth, without hesitation.

lards porsenal = Lord’s + Lars Porsena – Etruscan figure associated in conflicting legends with the traditional kings of Rome + porsenal – porcelain + arsenal + Porsena, Lars – king of Clusium, who swore by the nine gods to destroy Rome, but was prevented by Horatius at the bridge. John Joyce was quoted in, and on the book jacket of, Lars Porsena; or The Future of Swearing and Improper Language, by Robert Graves + REFERENCE.

ll. 7-8 Macaulay: Lays of Ancient Rome. “Lars Posena of Clusium By the nine gods he swore.”

Sheol = the underworld; the abode of the dead or departed spirits, conceived by the Hebrews as a subterranean region clothed in thick darkness, return from which is impossible.

l.8 Shoel: the grave. Hell.; Zakküm: in Islam theology, a thorny tree growing up from the bottomless pit.

ramify = to form branches, to branch out, extend in the form of branches + [ratify without allowing objections] + [sounding the ram’s horn].

Sheofon = heofon (Old English) – heaven

lux = light “Grace” in Dubliners: “lux upon lux”; [appointlex= a point of law]

suntime= suntime – time by the sun, a time of brightness or joy + sometime

marx my word fort = take my word for it – I can assure you, you may be sure, believe me + mark – to take notice, to keep watch; to fix (one’s) attention; to consider + Marx, Karl (1818-83) – German socialist.  

chip off the old Flint = chip of the old block – one that resembles his father + flint – hard stone in general + Flint, Captain – dead pirate in Stevenson’s Treasure Island

Nichtian = Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm (1844-1900) – German philosopher + nicht (ger) – not. 

aprioric = a priori – phrase used to characterize reasoning from causes to effects, from abstract notions to their conditions or consequences.

aposteriorious = a priori – phrase used to characterize reasoning from causes to effects, from abstract notions to their conditions or consequences. + [one’s posterior]

l.11 Jesperson: An International Language, quoting Dr. Sweet: ‘the ideal way of constructing an a posteriori language would be to make the root words monosyllabic…& to make the grammar a priori in spirit’

nat = not + nat (Danish) – night (Pronunciation ‘not’).

sinse = (Anglo-Irish Pronunciation) – sense

kish – a large wicker basket + kiss + Anglo-Irish/Hiberno-English phrase: ignorant as a kish of brogues.

sprogues = sprog (Danish) – language

elude – to slip away from, escape adroitly from (a person’s grasp or pursuit) + alluded

coctible = that may be cooked

l.15 coct: boil, digest, bake

remarxing = remark – to say, utter, or set down, as an observation or comment + [discussing socialism]

languidoily = languidly – in a languid (faint, weak) manner + [refined]

l.15 Langued’oil: Romance dialect of N. France

opening of a lifetime = (notebook 1924): ‘chance of a lifetime’ + [vagina]

pearlmothers = mother of pearl – the pinna or sea-pen, or other shell-fish yielding mother-of-pearl; mother of pearl oyster + Perlmutter (ger) – mother of pearl.

boy = champagne

wash down = to wash down – to swallow liquor along with or after (solid food), in order to assist deglutition or digestion.

Ruadh Cow at Tallaght = “At the foot of [Tallaght Hill] on the Blessingtom side, there stood an inn, called the Red Cow, which, in the month of December, 1717, was the scene of a sanguinary encounter between a party of rapparees…and the forces of the Crown” (Ball, History of County Dublin III, 39) [(notebook 1924): ‘Red Cow Tallaght’] + ruadh (rue) (geal) – red + Tamhlacht (toulokht) (geal) – “Plague-grave”: village S.W. of Dublin.

Good Woman at Ringsend = GOOD WOMAN, THE – Inn at Ringsend; noted for oysters, shrimps and cockles, as early as beginning of 18th cent [(notebook 1924): ‘Good Dame Ringsend’] + RINGSEND – District, South bank of Liffey, where it enters Dublin Bay. The Dodder River joins the Liffey just above Ringsend. 

l.17 Red Bank oysters

l.19 Red Cow Inn, Tallaght, scene of fighting between rapparees & Crown forces 1717.

Conway’s Inn at Blackrock = Irish Independent 10 Jun 1924, 4/6: ‘Dublin’s Old Inns and Taverns’: ‘Vanished also is Conway’s Tavern, that rose in the Main street of Blackrock. For long it commanded esteem for its annual melon festival’ [(notebook 1924): ‘Conway’s Tavern Blackrock’].

atte = at, at the (Middle English)

fun fain= fun fair – fair devoted to amusements and side shows + fe’n riaghail (fen riel) (geal) – under the government; under religious rules.

Adam and Eve’s = (notebook 1924): ‘Adam & Eve’ → Irish Independent 10 Jun 1924, 4/6: ‘Dublin’s Old Inns and Taverns’: ‘the taverns of Adam and Eve and the Struggler in Cook street’.

l.22 Adam & Eve’s Church, D. on site of tavern; Sir James Barrie: Quality Street

l.23 Grace: Prankqueen (021.05-.023.15)

Tailte – Firbolg queen whose foster-son, Lug, founded the Tailtean games in her honor. Revived by the Free State, the games are held in Teltown. 

 

lexinction = lexicon – the vocabulary proper to some department of knowledge or sphere of activity.

Declaney = Delaney, Patrick – the Phoenix Park assassin who testified against Parnell at the Parnell Commission.

boney = boney = bony – rel. to bone or bones; having large or prominent bones + [bonnie]

l.26 boney part = Bonaparte

southdowner = sheep from Southdown (town in England)

l.28 U.S. & Aust sundowner:tramp who arrives at station about sundown, to obtain food & night’s lodging:an evening drink

dielate = [dilated eyes for night vision]

my hat = a trivial exclamation of surprise 

sundowner = sundowner – hobo, tramp

spud in his faust = spat in his hands + Faust or Faustus – 16th-century magician who sold his soul to the devil, subject of works by Marlowe and Goethe + Faust (ger) – fist.

(axin) = axin (Anglo-Irish Pronunciation) – asking

tope = to drink; to drink largely or in large draughts + topped

raw best = rest + raw beast

poked his pick = picked his pocket + poke – to thrust or push (anything) with one’s hand or arm; to put in a poke or bag + pick – transf. that which is selected, the best or choicest portion or example of anything, the choicest product or contents.

tucked his friend’s leave = to take (one’s) leave – to depart with some expression of farewell; to bid farewell.

French hen or the portlifowlium = portfolio – a receptacle or case for keeping loose sheets of paper, prints, drawings, maps, music, or the like; usually in the form of a large book-cover, and sometimes having sheets of paper fixed in it, between which specimens are placed. [Suggesting the hen that dug the incriminating letter out of the dump]

hastes and leisures = proverb Marry in haste and repent at leisure.

pax = kiss of peace

poghue puxy = pogue (Anglo-Irish) – kiss + [poxy- carrying the pox]

breast = (notebook 1924): ‘frères du même sein’ (French brothers of the same breast)

hillelulia = alleluia = hallelujah – an exclamation meaning ‘Praise the Lord,’ which occurs in many psalms and anthems. + [references to the hill of the dump]; killelulia= [in the Irish language, kil =church but also burial site]; allenalaw = HILL OF ALLEN – Hill (676 feet), 8 miles North-East of Kildare, County Kildare; famous in legend as the Otherworld seat of Finn MacCool. Seefin, a mound on its summit, is known as Finn’s Chair. Alma on Almhain, Ir “whitened.” 

l.34 Lillibullero, Bullen a Law

menialstrait

torgantruce = tuargain (turgen) (geal) – battering, bombardment; schmall-

kalled = schmal (ger) – little, narrow + SCHMALKALDEN – City, East Germany, where in 1531 Lutheran princes formed the League of Schmalkalden against Charles V; it lasted until 1547, when Charles defeated its leaders and destroyed its power. 

l.36 2 gun truce; Treaty of Schmalkaldischer

treatyng to cognac = treaty – to make a treaty + to treat (a person, etc.) to – to entertain with (food or drink, or any enjoyment or gratification); fez = a skull-cap formerly of wool, now of felt, of a dull crimson colour, in the form of a truncated cone, ornamented with a long black tassel; formerly the national head-dress of the Turks + face;  menialstrait = MENAI STRAIT – The channel of the Irish Sea which separates Anglesey from Caernarvonshire (now Gwynedd), the mainland of Wales. It’s crossed on every trip between Ireland and Britain via Hohyhead, by suspension road bridge (“assbacks,”) or “tubular” railway bridge. 

l.37 Fez, city, Morocco.

END Page 83

Page 84

moscas = (sp) – flies

l.1 Moscow

mitsmiller = Arab Bismillah: in the name of Allah

hurooshoos = khorosho (Russian) – very well, O.K.

levanted = levant – to steal away, ‘bolt’, to abscond

tubular jurbulance = turbulence – stormy or tempestuous action; violence + Jubal and Tubal Cain – Jubal was “father of all such as handle the harp and organ”; Tubal was “instructor of every artificer in brass and iron” (Genesis, 4.) Their brother Jabal was father of those who live in tents and have cattle. 

l.2 Jubal Early: Confederate commander at 2nd Bull Run, 1862.

BULL RUN – Stream in Virginia, US; gave name to 2 Civil War battles (known to the Confederate side as Manassas). In Second Bull Run, Pope (84.06) was a Union general, Jubal Early (84.02) a Confederate.  

assback bridge = assback – the back on an ass + (notebook 1924): ‘assback roof’ + pons asinorum (l) – the asses’ bridge: a first difficulty.

l..3 pons asinorum (suspension bridge over Menai Strait)

Danegeld – an annual tax imposed at the end of the 10th c. or in the 11th c., originally (as is supposed) to provide funds for the protection of England from the Danes, and continued after the Norman Conquest as a land-tax.

humoral = humoral – of or belonging to, consisting of, or containing, any of the humours or fluids of the body. Also in mod. use, contained in or involving the blood or other body fluid.

hurlbat = hurlbat – a short javelin having a thong for recovering after hurling; some form of club, bat.

lignum vitae = lingum vitae – wood of life

l.5 lignum vitae: hard Am. or W Indian wood used in medicine

rhumanasant = reminiscent – having reminiscence of something

toboggan = originally, a light sledge consisting of a thin strip of wood turned up in front, used by the Canadian Indians for transport over snow; now, a similar vehicle, sometimes with low runners, used in the sport of coasting.

poop = the aftermost part of a ship, the stern; a short blast in a hollow tube, as a wind instrument; Also, the report of a gun + Pope, John (1822-95) – Union general who lost the 2d battle of Bull Run.

l.6 tobacco pipe

crowplucking = to have a crow to pluck with someone – to have something disagreeable or awkward to settle with someone, to clear up.

rialto = an exchange or market place + rialto (it) – height, rise.

PEARIDGE – The battle of Pea Ridge, in South Illinois, US, 7-8 March 1862, was a Union victory in the West theater of the Civil War. 

l.8 Little Big Horn, 1876; 

delaney = Delaney, Patrick – the Phoenix Park assassin who testified against Parnell at the Parnell Commission.

confederate = leagued, allied

fender = a metal frame placed in front of a fire to keep falling coals from rolling out into the room.

ballsbluffed = bluff – to swell out, become distended + BALL’S BLUFF – Locality near Leesburg, North-East Virginia, US. Site of minor Civil War battle 21 Oct 1861 defeated by the Confederates. 

bore up = to bear up – to carry

contusium = contusion – a bruise

coccyx = the small triangular bone appended to the point of the sacrum and forming the termination of the spinal column in man.

flabbergaze = flabbergast – to put (a person) in such confusion that he does not for the moment know what to do or say; to astonish utterly, to confound.

Paddybanners = paddy – policeman; Irishman; the proprietary name of an Irish whiskey + banner – one who bans or curses.

exilicy = excellency – a title of honour +[bannished person of renown]

O’Daffy = daffy – crazy, imbecile + O’Duffy, General – leader of an Irish fascist movement (Blueshirts) in the 1930s.

nobiloroman = William Shakespeare: Julius Caesar V.5.68: ‘This was the noblest Roman of them all’

sitisfactuary = satisfactory + sitisfactura (l artificial) – a making thirsty.

l.15 [conclusium] Macaulay: “Lars Porsena of Clusium”

 jugglemonkysh agripment = gentleman’s agreement – an agreement which is not enforceable at law, and which is only binding as a matter of honour + Agrippa, Heinrich Cornelius of Nettesheim (1486-1535) – writer on occult sciences. 

l. 16 Cornelius Agrippa: platonist & ‘natural magician’

deinderivative = dein (ger) – your + deinde (l) – thereafter + derivative – characterized by being derived, drawn, obtained, or deduced from another; coming or emanating from a source.

fomentation = fomentation – the application to the surface of the body either of flannels, etc. soaked in hot water, whether simple or medicated, or of any other warm, soft, medicinal substance + (notebook 1922-23): ‘hot fomantations to ear’.

 poppyheads = poppyhead – the capsule of the poppy

l.17 (opium)

l.18 [jennerously] Jenner invented vaccination

exhibited = exhibit – (Med.) To administer (a remedy, etc.)

watchhouse = watchhouse – a house in which a guard is placed, police station

Vicar = vicar – in early use, a person acting as priest in a parish in place of the real parson or rector, or as the representative of a religious community to which the tithes had been appropriated.

l.19 Vicar St, D; Vico Road, Dalkey

ground = the particular space or area under consideration

digonally redcrossed = red cross – to mark with a red cross + [spot marked where digging is to be done]

l.20 [nonfatal] = nonfoetal

l.22 [defience] = defence + [defiance] 

stanch = to stop the flow of blood from (a wound)

pavilion = the pinna or auricle of the ear

hitter = one who hits or strikes, as in boxing, cricket, etc. Also fig.

l.23 hatter’s hares

knut = a fashionable or showy young man

Colt – a firearm of a type invented by Samuel Colt (1814-62), esp. a type of repeating pistol.

allround – around all the parts of, including everything in a given circle + [the Colt45 is a revolver]

middling along = to muddle along – to ‘get along’ in a haphazard way, to escape absolute failure though trusting to chance and makeshift expedients.

corso = proud walk, a promenade + torso – the human trunk.

a whit = not a whit – not at all + a whit – a very little + [a wit].

l.27 It in corso: in progress

[whorse = worse + whore + horse]

whacking = beating

Herwho = Herr (ger) – Mr.

END Page 84, l. 27

100 Words: A few words about the personal exploration of this month’s text 

[These entries are somewhat random, thoughts that arise from reading the text and my brief research about the page. These are hardly intended to be academic criticism.]

[This week’s excerpt is long by our standards. I found myself “daydreaming” about Tindall’s highlight of the “confederate fender.” The phrase links to the American Civil War, paralleling that other unbrotherly “brother-against-brother” combat. The South considered itself under attack, so it was the {de}fender. My personal Belle refers to the conflict as “The War of Northern Aggression.” The cad and Earwicker are also in internecine combat. Here is an attempt to reveal the sins of the darkest night by lighting them with the day’s harsh sun. I found myself applying the tussle of Freudian insatiable appetites in the Id against the inquisitional Superego. Both feed on HCE. That’s another swell rabbit hole to dive down. The reader who prefers to avoid that digression can duck into a foxhole instead, saved from the volley of ideas whizzing overhead.]