About Giacomo Joyce (GJ)

James Joyce’s Personal Obsession

The last task should be deciding what type of artistic creation is Giacomo Joyce. It would be helpful to begin reading with that task in mind. It might be a prose poem. It might be a diary, a confession, or an exploration of streams of consciousness. Joyce called the episodes sketches when Pound asked him for publishable work. Whichever form it is, it’s spiced with excitation, penanced with pain. Richard Ellmann’s introduction, perhaps three times the word count of the piece itself, says Giacomo Joyce is not strictly autobiographical. Joyce didn’t see his subject after 1909 if SHE is Amalia and her husband is to be believed, but some events in this work take place much later. There may be a second Amalia, maybe a third. That would be long after 1909. Joyce perseverated over the possibility that Martha Fleischmann might be Jewish too. This might also make her a candidate for the title of “Dark Who.” This would be dangerous speculation as fascism reared up, and not a possibility the Fleischmanns might like explored. Another possibility is that Amalia returns periodically as a specter even more ephemeral than the SHE of 1907 and 1908.

Joyce himself never put the title Giacomo Joyce to the pages. Certainly, the title refers to Casanova but written not by Joyce but by some unknown spirit. You might now suspect these pages are an undated diary, including flights of the imagination rather than a prose poem. There is a third possibility: despite the imposed title suggesting the subject is Joyce, the piece might be an authentic portrait capturing SHE at a moment in time.

For now, I’ll assign thoughts about Giacomo’s reverie to cantos. In the manuscript, SHE adorns her knotted hair like Beatrice Cenci’s. Raped by her father, that Beatrice murdered him and was beheaded. Thus the reader might infer the suggestion of punishment for an older man who defiles a young student. Ellmann also notes a connection to Dante’s ideal, Beatrice Portinari.

The most excellent testimonial from penurious Joyce is that he never submitted the work for publication or even had it typed. I have been guilty of undervaluing Joyce’s poesy excepting “Ecce Puer.” Like all the longer revered works, Giacomo Joyce is, I now think, also revolutionary, a hammered and tempered one-of-of-a kind monstrance of rococo silver with a golden chamber of adoration at the core.

Read the sixteen-page text of Giacomo Joyce here…

Copyright @ don ward, 2020

Related Websites We Like

Tom O’Carroll, a Friend to the JJRC, Sends Musical Joycean Cheer for Saint Patrick’s Day.

Tom’s entertainment begins with his treatment of “Finnegan’s Wake.” Sing along. There’s no one listening.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-_xVishGgg

The Art of Bloomsday at the Olivier Cornet Gallery of Dublin

If you find yourself with an irresistible yearning for the ineluctable modality of the visual, take a digital stroll down Dear Dirty’s Great Denmark Street. This gallery has celebrated Bloomsday festivals with art from a range of styles and media. No doubt, you’ll find something that will entertain and engage.

The Olivier Cornet Gallery’s Bloomsday Exhibitions

Ulysses(U) on YouTube (U Tube?)

Bloomsday in Melbourne has produced a series of vignettes using some of the best of the language in our favorite novel. Alternately referred to as Bloomsday in Plaguetime 2020 or ZOOMsday in Melbourne, it’s a lovely appetizer of words for those hungry for a Ulysses sampler. It’s a great way to entice the first-time reader, but like the novel, its suitability for minors is cautioned.

Blogs & Podcasts

Blooms & Barnacles is a blog, podcast, and illustration project celebrating the love of James Joyce’s Ulysses. Hosted by Kelly Bryan (blogger) and Dermot O Connor (illustrator), Blooms & Barnacles takes a non-academic approach, mixing banter and pop culture with historical, cultural, and literary analysis related to Ulysses and most anything Joyce-adjacent, including chats with other amateur Joyce enthusiasts. Hopefully, through Blooms & Barnacles, Ulysses and the work of Joyce can become more accessible to anyone who wants to read it. 

The website is:
https://bloomsandbarnacles.com

Other Sources

Those reading the “about Dubliners” essays on the JJRC may find a line by line analysis of stories in the collection to be of interest.
 
Dubliners Reading Group Zoom bi-weekly Donations are expected.
Contact: Mike Graves 1 (718) 612-4843 (there may not be a greeting on the voice mail) mikegraves50@hotmail.com
 

Catherine Flynn of Berkeley is assembling a series of podcasts celebrating the 100th anniversary of Ulysses’ publication. It’s early days in the evolution of Ulysses ’22 (the centenary year). Here is what has been revealed to date.

Podcasts construct around the student introduction of an episode and three sets of observations: a researcher, an instructor, and a typical or atypical recreational reader. The podcasts run about one hour in duration. The Telemachus episode was released on June 10 and Nestor on July 5. No anticipated date is posted for the Proteus episode.

The website URL can be called on at…

https://U22pod.com

Roger Cummiskey’s Artwork for the Ulysses Centennary…

can now be viewed at https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/roger-cummiskey?tab=artworkgalleries&artworkgalleryid=824&fbclid=IwAR0fu1enMi5MhUv7CKg3yxW9un3jI3-cOUbo3n8lwWL6Ra7eu3LZA047ij4

or alternately at Roger’s own website at http://Rogercummiskey.com

 

 

 

(U) Episode 1: “Telemachus” ~pp 1-24.

“Mulligan and the Milk Maid” copyright @ don ward, 2020

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses.

  • Title: Telemachus
  • Scene: The Tower
  • Hour: 8 a.m.
  • Organ: (none)
  • Art: Theology
  • Colour: White, gold
  • Symbol: Heir
  • Technic: Narrative (young)

“Horn of a bull, hoof of a horse, smile of a Saxon.”

 

Stephen’s dangers to the Irish.

What’s Important?

The attached WordCloud created courtesy of WordCloud.com shows the incidence of important words appearing in the post about Episode 1 four or more times. Frequency may signify importance.

Copyright @ don ward, 2020

(U) Episode 2: “Nestor” ~pp 25-37.

 

“Befriended Bullock” copyright@ don ward, 2020

 

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses.

Episode 2

  • Title: Nestor
  • Scene: The School
  • Hour: 10 a.m.
  • Organ: (none)
  • Art: History
  • Colour: Brown
  • Symbol: Horse
  • Technic: Catechism (personal)

“My childhood bends beside me. Too far for me to lay a hand there once or lightly. Mine is far and his secret as our eyes. Secrets, silent, stony sit in the dark palaces of both our hearts; secrets weary of their tyranny: tyrants willing to be dethroned.”

Stephen contemplates shared humanity

What’s Important?

The attached WordCloud created courtesy of WordCloud.com shows the incidence of important words appearing in the post about Episode 2 three or more times. Frequency may signify importance.

Copyright @ don ward, 2020

(U) Episode 3: “Proteus,” ~pp 37-51.

Sandymount from Dun Laoghaire – “Walking toward Eternity,” copyright @ don ward, 2020

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses.

  • Title: Proteus
  • Scene: Sandymount Strand
  • Hour: 11 a.m.
  • Organ: (none)
  • Art: Philology
  • Colour: Green
  • Symbol: Tide
  • Technic: Monologue (male)

One Favorite Quote among Many

” Me sits there his augur’s rod of ash in borrowed sandals, by day beside a livid sea, unbeheld, in violet night walking beneath a reign of uncouth stars.”

Stephen contemplates a life as yet unripened

What’s Important?

The attached WordCloud created courtesy of WordCloud.com shows the incidence of important words appearing in the post about Episode 3 usually three or more times. Frequency may signify importance.

Copyright @ don ward, 2020

(U) Episode 4: “Calypso,”~pp 54-69.

Chamber of the Scalded Pot

copyright@ don ward, 2020

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses.

  • Title: Calypso
  • Scene: The House (7 Eccles Street)
  • Hour: 8 a.m.
  • Organ: Kidney
  • Art: Economics
  • Colour: Orange
  • Symbol: Nymph
  • Technic: Narrative (mature)

One Favorite Quote among Many

“O, rocks!” She said. “Tell us in plain words.”

Molly on Geology and vocabulary

What’s Important?

The attached WordCloud created courtesy of WordCloud.com shows the incidence of important words appearing in the post about this episode usually three or more times. Frequency may signify importance.

Copyright @ don ward, 2020

(U) Episode 18: “Penelope,” ~pp 723-783.

Gibraltar on Liffey

copyright @ don ward, 2020

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses

  • Title: Penelope
  • Scene: The Bed
  • Time: (none)
  • Organ: Flesh
  • Art: (none)
  • Colour: (none)
  • Symbol: Earth
  • Technic: Monologue (female)

One favorite among many quotes

“…she had too much old chat in her about politics and earthquakes and the end of the world let us have a bit of fun first God help the world….”

Molly about Dante Riordan (and us)

What’s Important

The attached WordCloud created courtesy of WordCloud.com shows the incidence of important words appearing in the post about this episode. Frequency may signify importance.

Copyright @ don ward, 2020

(U) Episode 5: “The Lotus Eaters,” ~pp 70-85.

“Under Poldy’s Hat” copyright @ don ward 2020

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses.

  • Title: The Lotus Eaters
  • Scene: The Bath
  • Hour: 10 a.m.
  • Organ: Genitals
  • Art: Botany, Chemistry
  • Colour: (None)
  • Symbol: Eucharist
  • Technic: Narcissism

One Favorite Quote among Many

“Curse your noisy pugnose.”

Bloom mentally abuses the “honking” tram driver blocking his view

What’s Important?

The attached WordCloud created courtesy of WordCloud.com shows the incidence of important words appearing in the post about this episode usually three or more times. Frequency may signify importance.

copyright @ don ward, 2020

(U) Episode 6: “Hades,” ~pp 86-114.

 

 

“And He Came Fifth and Lost the Job” copyright @ don ward 2020

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses

  • Title: Hades
  • Scene: The Graveyard
  • Hour: 11 a.m.
  • Organ: Heart
  • Art: Religion
  • Colour: White, Black
  • Symbol: Caretaker
  • Technic: Incubism

“Get up! Last day! Then every fellow mousing around for his liver and his lights and the rest of his traps. Find damn all of himself that morning. Pennyweight of powder in a skull. Twelve grammes one pennyweight. Troy measure.”

Bloom (or the narrator) on the Last Day

What’s Important?

The attached WordCloud created courtesy of WordCloud.com shows the incidence of important words appearing in the post about this episode usually three or more times. Frequency may signify importance.

copyright @ don ward, 2020