(D) about “An Encounter” June 14

The school year traditionally ended on June 30 (Terrence Murphy in “James Joyce and Narrative Territory: The Distinct Functions of Lost Time in ‘An Encounter” and ‘The Sisters’”), and Jackson and McGinley indicate Pluck’s first issue, in Joe Dillon’s “little library,” would not be available until June. Most significantly, the Joyce brothers miching expedition occurredContinue reading “(D) about “An Encounter” June 14″

(D) about “Araby” May 18

Residents of Dublin are paralyzed by the darkness. That darkness gathers under an enchanted cloak thrown across them. The cloak is woven of mythical threads of secrets of religious ritual, sexual mysteries, and the imperfection of courtly love. Blindness has many causes. A Jackson and McGinley note for “Araby” points out that Launcelot found himself withContinue reading “(D) about “Araby” May 18″

(D)about “A Little Cloud” ~December 1 (“Late Autumn”)

Joyce named this story as a personal favorite. He honored it by returning to the title imagery repeatedly over the thirty-five years that followed. The little cloud originates in Elijah’s ascension in a fiery chariot and a wailing child in Blake’s “Mad Song.” Gordon economically says “A Little Cloud” “…reflects the kinds of allusions thatContinue reading “(D)about “A Little Cloud” ~December 1 (“Late Autumn”)”

(D) about “Eveline,” October 8

Hugh Kenner invites us to consider that Frank of “Eveline” speaks for Frank’s creator, James Joyce. Sondra Melzer expands that comparison claiming Eveline speaks for Nora Barnacle. Joyce carried Nora off to parts unknown on October 8, 1904, but resisted any urge to marry her until 1931. Were his motives noble, or did he findContinue reading “(D) about “Eveline,” October 8″

(D) about “Counterparts,” February 16

  [Setting “Counterparts” on the Dubliners Calendar requires some finesse. If sunset occurs at about 5:30 PM, the date might be soon after February 12 and also after mid-month. Ireland, however, did not begin Daylight Savings Time until 1916. Joyce finished Counterparts on July 16, 1905. Alternately, the sunset might coincide with a November setting,Continue reading “(D) about “Counterparts,” February 16″

(D) about “The Dead,” January 6

‘the dead are dancing with the dead./The dust is whirling with the dust.’ (Oscar Wilde, “The Harlot’s House”) Befuddled Julia Morkan, “toddling” on the arm of Mister Archibald DeathBrowne, appears “ignorant, old, grey-skinned, and stupified.” She exits the room of her minor musical triumph for the feast where Gabriel of the next generation will eulogize herContinue reading “(D) about “The Dead,” January 6″

(D) about “A Painful Case,” November

https://jamesjoycereadingcircle.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=2116&action=edit# “He walked along quickly through the November twilight, his stout hazel stick striking the ground regularly,….” Duffy furnishes his tidy Chapelizod dungeon with an unusual number of cold iron appurtenances. The few colors of his flat (“white bedclothes and a black and scarlet rug”) suggest sterility, moroseness, and violence. Into his window peeps aContinue reading “(D) about “A Painful Case,” November”

(D) about “Clay,” October 31

Dublin by Lamplight competed against the Catholic-run Magdelena laundries for business and a workforce. This laundry advantaged its prosperous neighbors and leveraged the friendship and business associations of the Protestant board members. Lamplight was perhaps also more attractive to “working girls” because it intended to convert fallen women by employing the Protestant carrot more oftenContinue reading “(D) about “Clay,” October 31″

A Year of Dubliners (D)

What follows will be an experiment. I have long suspected that there is a calendar nesting among the fifteen stories of Dubliners. Beginning with “Clay” on November 5, I will post an essay about each story in the collection. The stories will follow the Celtic Year. Success in laying out a defensible schema is notContinue reading “A Year of Dubliners (D)”

Related Websites We Like

Tom O’Carroll, a Friend to the JJRC, Sends Musical Joycean Cheer for Saint Patrick’s Day. Tom’s entertainment begins with his treatment of “Finnegan’s Wake.” Sing along. There’s no one listening. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-_xVishGgg     The Art of Bloomsday at the Olivier Cornet Gallery of Dublin If you find yourself with an irresistible yearning for the ineluctableContinue reading “Related Websites We Like”