(D) about “An Encounter” June 14

The school year traditionally ended on June 30 (Terrence Murphy in “James Joyce and Narrative Territory: The Distinct Functions of Lost Time in ‘An Encounter” and ‘The Sisters’”), and Jackson and McGinley indicate Pluck’s first issue, in Joe Dillon’s “little library,” would not be available until June. Most significantly, the Joyce brothers miching expedition occurredContinue reading “(D) about “An Encounter” June 14″

(D) about “Araby” May 18

Residents of Dublin are paralyzed by the darkness. That darkness gathers under an enchanted cloak thrown across them. The cloak is woven of mythical threads of secrets of religious ritual, sexual mysteries, and the imperfection of courtly love. Blindness has many causes. A Jackson and McGinley note for “Araby” points out that Launcelot found himself withContinue reading “(D) about “Araby” May 18″

Bloomsday Celebrations ’21 around the Globe

BLOOMSDAY 2021 EM FLORIANÓPOLIS Convite Neste ano, o Bloomsday de Florianópolis acontecerá nas páginas de um jornal, “O Dia de Hoje” que circulará online em 16 de junho, porém, o ano será o de 1904, data em que transcorre o enredo de “Ulisses” romance de Joyce cujo protagonista, Leopoldo Bloom, leva e traz mensagens, por meio de núnciosContinue reading “Bloomsday Celebrations ’21 around the Globe”

Where Has Your Copy of Ulysses Been?

The James Joyce Reading Circle targets a readership of about 400. That is the optimum size for a community. This is not done to be elitist but to try to actually know something about something about those we are trying to serve. That’s a typical size for an Amish community but not for a followingContinue reading “Where Has Your Copy of Ulysses Been?”

(D)about “A Little Cloud” ~December 1 (“Late Autumn”)

Joyce named this story as a personal favorite. He honored it by returning to the title imagery repeatedly over the thirty-five years that followed. The little cloud originates in Elijah’s ascension in a fiery chariot and a wailing child in Blake’s “Mad Song.” Gordon economically says “A Little Cloud” “…reflects the kinds of allusions thatContinue reading “(D)about “A Little Cloud” ~December 1 (“Late Autumn”)”

(D) about “Eveline,” October 8

Hugh Kenner invites us to consider that Frank of “Eveline” speaks for Frank’s creator, James Joyce. Sondra Melzer expands that comparison claiming Eveline speaks for Nora Barnacle. Joyce carried Nora off to parts unknown on October 8, 1904, but resisted any urge to marry her until 1931. Were his motives noble, or did he findContinue reading “(D) about “Eveline,” October 8″

(D) about “Counterparts,” February 16

  [Setting “Counterparts” on the Dubliners Calendar requires some finesse. If sunset occurs at about 5:30 PM, the date might be soon after February 12 and also after mid-month. Ireland, however, did not begin Daylight Savings Time until 1916. Joyce finished Counterparts on July 16, 1905. Alternately, the sunset might coincide with a November setting,Continue reading “(D) about “Counterparts,” February 16″

(D) about “The Dead,” January 6

‘the dead are dancing with the dead./The dust is whirling with the dust.’ (Oscar Wilde, “The Harlot’s House”) Befuddled Julia Morkan, “toddling” on the arm of Mister Archibald DeathBrowne, appears “ignorant, old, grey-skinned, and stupified.” She exits the room of her minor musical triumph for the feast where Gabriel of the next generation will eulogize herContinue reading “(D) about “The Dead,” January 6″

(GJ) Canto IXXX (p. 11, ll. 1-9).

Tie My girdle for me and bind up this hair in any simple knot. If you have been reading this blog, you may remember another mention of Beatrice Cenci by Dante in The Divine Comedy. In this canto, Joyce uses a quote from Shelley’s tragedy The Cenci. Shelley’s play focuses on the abuse of a daughter andContinue reading “(GJ) Canto IXXX (p. 11, ll. 1-9).”

(GJ) Canto XXVI (p.9, ll. 21-31).

I play lightly, softly singing, John Dowland’s languid song.  In this canto, Joyce sings and plays love songs in the Popper home until dawn approaches. Delaying the walk home, he ends the evening singing John Dowland’s “Loath to Depart.” The tune is Elizabethian and written for the lute. Presumably, the Maestro would accompany himself onContinue reading “(GJ) Canto XXVI (p.9, ll. 21-31).”