(U) Ulysses, “Scylla and Charybdis,” Episode 9~ pp.182-215.

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses Title: Scylla and Charybdis Scene: The Library Time: 2 p.m. Organ: Brain Art: Literature Colour: (none) Symbol: Stratford, London Technic: Dialectic Favorite Quotes among Many “No, no, put all your backs into it, row on;/ invoke Blind Force, that bore this scourge of men,/ to keep her fromContinue reading “(U) Ulysses, “Scylla and Charybdis,” Episode 9~ pp.182-215.”

(U) Ulysses “Lestrygonians,” Episode 8~pp 149-81.

Episode References from Stuart Gilbert’s James Joyce’s Ulysses Title: Lestrygonians Scene: The Lunch Time: 1 p.m. Organ: Esophagus Art: Architecture Colour: (none) Symbol: Constables Technic: Peristaltic Delicious Quotes among Many Favorites “Bloo…Me? No. Blood of the Lamb.”           says Bloom as he misreads the flyer about the coming of Elijah.   —-HeContinue reading “(U) Ulysses “Lestrygonians,” Episode 8~pp 149-81.”

(Da) Virag’s Suicide: Tears Bloom

6 Not apple-trees were there, but thorns with poison. 7 Such tangled thickets have not, nor so dense,  8 Those savage wild beasts, that in hatred hold  9 ‘Twixt Cecina and Corneto the tilled places. (Longfellow, canto xiii)   In Dante’s Inferno, the poet gives his greatest attention to suicides who are violent due toContinue reading “(Da) Virag’s Suicide: Tears Bloom”

(Da) Guides through the Afterlife in The Divine Comedy and Ulysses

James Joyce acknowledged his debt to Dante (The Divine Comedy) when crafting Ulysses. The two masterpieces and the Odyssey and Aeneid that preceded them, each include the device of a guide (or guides through the afterlife). In Inferno, that guide is Virgil; in Ulysses, Mr. Leopold Bloom mentors the underripe Stephen Dedalus. Over the comingContinue reading “(Da) Guides through the Afterlife in The Divine Comedy and Ulysses”

(Da) Virgil, Bloom, and Dante’s Hillside Predators

—O, there you are, Mr Bloom said, turning from the fire. (“Calypso”)   When asked his status, Leopold Bloom might give Virgil’s answer: “Not man; man once I was” (Dante Canto i l. 67). Bloom lost his way by middle life, buffeted among three carnivorous beasts, becoming more peculiar in his ways. The catalysts forContinue reading “(Da) Virgil, Bloom, and Dante’s Hillside Predators”

(FOC) The Violent Bear It Away: Razor Wire across a Plowed Plot

For over a decade, Caroline Gordon was generous with her advice to an inexperienced and she thought undereducated Flannery O’Connor. Initially, the younger woman accepted all criticism and direction without question; eventually, the narrow focus of the feedback caused O’Connor to balk and ask for second opinions from the Fitzgeralds and others. Gordon could beContinue reading “(FOC) The Violent Bear It Away: Razor Wire across a Plowed Plot”

(Da) Modern Bloom and Dante’s Medieval Virgil

Odyssey to Aeneid, Aeneid into Inferno, Inferno becomes Ulysses. A cavalcade of mentors leads pilgrims through Hell in these epics of Western Literature. In each case, it’s an otherworldly trek where above-ground physics stands on its head in simoniac fashion. Time is the first natural law to be violated. Early in Inferno, Canto I (Longfellow’s translation), we find… 37 The time was the beginning ofContinue reading “(Da) Modern Bloom and Dante’s Medieval Virgil”

(FW) Finnegans Wake in Words and Music at Waywords and Meansigns

Waywords and Meansigns Opendoor Edition. Finnegans Wake set to music. The UlyssesCentenary has arrived. This delivers on two portents: That Centenary fun is almost done; and, it’s time to prepare the FinnWakeCentenary. I presume the FinnWakeCent will be an improvement since it will recycle until the FinnWakeBiCent. The best way I have found to beginContinue reading “(FW) Finnegans Wake in Words and Music at Waywords and Meansigns”

(Da) Dante and Dedalus; Virgil and Virag

James Joyce, Flannery O’Connor, William Kennedy of Albany, and other writers have mined Dante’s philosophy and poetry for substructures to underpin their fiction. During the coming months, The James Joyce Reading Circle will post a series of essays to explore the connections between Ulysses and the Divine Comedy. Other connections may also be explored inContinue reading “(Da) Dante and Dedalus; Virgil and Virag”

(M) Joyce’s Modernism : Gravity, Magnetism, and Desire

One’s perception,…must be motivated by being drawn toward its objects by desire, and desire is always based on an imagined response. Sheldon Brivic on Lucan’s Philosophy in “Images of the Lacanian Gaze in Ulysses” Introduction Mr. Bloom “adduce(d) to prove that his tendency was towards applied, rather than towards pure, science(.)” The focus on applied scienceContinue reading “(M) Joyce’s Modernism : Gravity, Magnetism, and Desire”