A Review of Miss Lonelyhearts: An unlikely comparison of the writings of Nathanael West and Flannery O’Connor

It began two months ago when I watched and did research on the movie Suspicion. It is not a great movie. I would not even call it a good movie. Researching it, I discovered Nathanael West had written the screenplay, but before he delivered the script, the Hitchcock/Reviles, with help, had pieced together a script ofContinue reading “A Review of Miss Lonelyhearts: An unlikely comparison of the writings of Nathanael West and Flannery O’Connor”

A Review of Nick Sweeney’s A Blue Coast Mystery

Before the surrealists began to melt away, Greek-born Italian metaphysicist painter Georgio de Chirico juxtaposed mannequins and aqueducts, the imaginary beside the concrete, liquid by solid on canvas. One of his paintings, probably stolen, adorns Nick Sweeney’s A Blue Coast Mystery. It ties the suite together, as startling and quirky as Sweeney’s tale and theContinue reading “A Review of Nick Sweeney’s A Blue Coast Mystery”

Casey Lawrence “From Cap and Apron to Bella Cohen: the genetics of vicelike corsets”

Casey Lawrence’s presentation was well-organized and practiced. The focus of the presentation was tight (I won’t say corsetted) and properly so for the short duration of the time allowed.  I was recently surreptitiously prodded to contribute to a student’s assignment: What is the theme of the Circe episode of Ulysses? I declined to write contentContinue reading “Casey Lawrence “From Cap and Apron to Bella Cohen: the genetics of vicelike corsets””

John McCourt: The Origins of Bloomsday.

My recollection (sometimes or usually faulty) is that Professor McCourt said the earliest celebrations were called Ulysses Day with the first occurring in 1924. Attempting to improve on my memory I found a claim that Joyce’s unnamed friends began annual celebrations immediately after publication. Joyce mentioned the celebration in a letter after being presented aContinue reading “John McCourt: The Origins of Bloomsday.”

Joyce Seeing Eye to Eye with Picasso?: A Review of “James Joyce and the Cubist Esthetic.” by JO-ANNA ISAAK 

  Source: Mosaic: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal, WINTER 1981, Vol. 14, No. 1 (WINTER 1981), pp. 61-90  Published by: University of Manitoba  Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/24780356  Introduction I am neither a physicist nor an art historian. I do have a layman’s interest in these disciplines but claim no expertise. I know a bit more about the writingsContinue reading “Joyce Seeing Eye to Eye with Picasso?: A Review of “James Joyce and the Cubist Esthetic.” by JO-ANNA ISAAK “

About Giacomo Joyce (GJ)

Ellmann’s Edition The last task should be deciding what type of artistic creation is Giacomo Joyce. It would be helpful to begin reading with that task in mind. It might be a prose poem. It might be a diary, a confession, or an exploration of streams of consciousness. Joyce called the episodes “sketches” when Pound asked himContinue reading “About Giacomo Joyce (GJ)”

(GJ) Cantos XLVIII-XLIX (p.16. ll. 24-27, 31).

Her arms: a casque, gules, and blunt spear on a field, sable.  The tale is told, although neither that subject nor verb is accurate of what we witnessed. There has been no narrative; the sharing has been secretive. It is unlikely that the Poppers or other contenders for the role of “Dark Who” would beContinue reading “(GJ) Cantos XLVIII-XLIX (p.16. ll. 24-27, 31).”

(GJ) Cantos XLVI-XLVII (p.16, ll.12-16, 20).

…foliage of stars-s-and waning heaven-c-stillness-e-…./ Non hunc sed Barabbam!  On first reading, these cantos seem among the simplest of Giacomo Joyce. The simplicity is as deceptive as a Judas kiss. As ever, time twists, shapes shift, and identities intermingle. The essential puzzle of the prose poem changes too from “Who?” (now answered) to “Why?” which mayContinue reading “(GJ) Cantos XLVI-XLVII (p.16, ll.12-16, 20).”

(GJ) Canto XLV (p.16, ll. 1-8).

Youth has an end: the end is here. It will never be. You know that wen. What then? Write it, damn you, write it! What else are you good for?  Vicki Mahaffey notes that Joyce’s memories of Sweelinck’s clavichord tunes recall childhood days. Noted as Europe’s foremost keyboard player until J.S. Bach, many of theContinue reading “(GJ) Canto XLV (p.16, ll. 1-8).”