(D) about “Eveline,” October 8

Hugh Kenner invites us to consider that Frank of “Eveline” speaks for Frank’s creator, James Joyce. Sondra Melzer expands that comparison claiming Eveline speaks for Nora Barnacle. Joyce carried Nora off to parts unknown on October 8, 1904, but resisted any urge to marry her until 1931. Were his motives noble, or did he findContinue reading “(D) about “Eveline,” October 8″

(D) about “Counterparts,” February 16

  [Setting “Counterparts” on the Dubliners Calendar requires some finesse. If sunset occurs at about 5:30 PM, the date might be soon after February 12 and also after mid-month. Ireland, however, did not begin Daylight Savings Time until 1916. Joyce finished Counterparts on July 16, 1905. Alternately, the sunset might coincide with a November setting,Continue reading “(D) about “Counterparts,” February 16″

(D) about “The Dead,” January 6

‘the dead are dancing with the dead./The dust is whirling with the dust.’ (Oscar Wilde, “The Harlot’s House”) Befuddled Julia Morkan, “toddling” on the arm of Mister Archibald DeathBrowne, appears “ignorant, old, grey-skinned, and stupified.” She exits the room of her minor musical triumph for the feast where Gabriel of the next generation will eulogize herContinue reading “(D) about “The Dead,” January 6″

(GJ) Canto IXXX (p. 11, ll. 1-9).

Tie My girdle for me and bind up this hair in any simple knot. If you have been reading this blog, you may remember another mention of Beatrice Cenci by Dante in The Divine Comedy. In this canto, Joyce uses a quote from Shelley’s tragedy The Cenci. Shelley’s play focuses on the abuse of a daughter andContinue reading “(GJ) Canto IXXX (p. 11, ll. 1-9).”

(GJ) Canto XXVI (p.9, ll. 21-31).

I play lightly, softly singing, John Dowland’s languid song.  In this canto, Joyce sings and plays love songs in the Popper home until dawn approaches. Delaying the walk home, he ends the evening singing John Dowland’s “Loath to Depart.” The tune is Elizabethian and written for the lute. Presumably, the Maestro would accompany himself onContinue reading “(GJ) Canto XXVI (p.9, ll. 21-31).”

(GJ) Canto XXII (p.8, ll. 29-36).

The sellers offer on their altars the first fruits: green- flecked lemons, jewelled cherries, shameful peaches with torn leaves…. Owlish wisdom stares from their eyes brooding upon the lore of their Summa contra Gentiles.  Many Jews landed in Trieste after fleeing mistreatment in the Russias. The Jewish and Irish diasporas have met, and James JoyceContinue reading “(GJ) Canto XXII (p.8, ll. 29-36).”

(D) about “A Painful Case,” November

https://jamesjoycereadingcircle.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=2116&action=edit# “He walked along quickly through the November twilight, his stout hazel stick striking the ground regularly,….” Duffy furnishes his tidy Chapelizod dungeon with an unusual number of cold iron appurtenances. The few colors of his flat (“white bedclothes and a black and scarlet rug”) suggest sterility, moroseness, and violence. Into his window peeps aContinue reading “(D) about “A Painful Case,” November”

(D) about “Clay,” October 31

Dublin by Lamplight competed against the Catholic-run Magdelena laundries for business and a workforce. This laundry advantaged its prosperous neighbors and leveraged the friendship and business associations of the Protestant board members. Lamplight was perhaps also more attractive to “working girls” because it intended to convert fallen women by employing the Protestant carrot more oftenContinue reading “(D) about “Clay,” October 31″

A Year of Dubliners (D)

What follows will be an experiment. I have long suspected that there is a calendar nesting among the fifteen stories of Dubliners. Beginning with “Clay” on November 5, I will post an essay about each story in the collection. The stories will follow the Celtic Year. Success in laying out a defensible schema is notContinue reading “A Year of Dubliners (D)”

About Giacomo Joyce (GJ)

James Joyce’s Personal Obsession The last task should be deciding what type of artistic creation is Giacomo Joyce. It would be helpful to begin reading with that task in mind. It might be a prose poem. It might be a diary, a confession, or an exploration of streams of consciousness. Joyce called the episodes sketches when PoundContinue reading “About Giacomo Joyce (GJ)”